Capacitors and Inductors

152 views

what’s the difference? I understand that Capacitors “store” energy in an electric field and capacitors in a magnetic field… but what does it means? what’s the purpose?

In: 11

12 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Capacitor is like the electronic equivalent of a spring: charge it up and it’ll push back with a voltage. Inductor is like the electronic equivalent of a mass: run a current through it and it’ll resist changes to that current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Capacitor is like the electronic equivalent of a spring: charge it up and it’ll push back with a voltage. Inductor is like the electronic equivalent of a mass: run a current through it and it’ll resist changes to that current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Capacitor is like the electronic equivalent of a spring: charge it up and it’ll push back with a voltage. Inductor is like the electronic equivalent of a mass: run a current through it and it’ll resist changes to that current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Inductors resist change in current, they want the current to keep doing what it’s doing, like a spinning wheel.

Among other things this can be used to remove high frequency noise, the noise is rapid changes in the current and the inductor wants to keep the current consistent.

Meanwhile capacitors are more like springs. They can be pushed or pulled away from their neutral point but only so far. When they are away from the neutral point they want to return to it, releasing that stored energy.

Unlike inductors they don’t mind rapid changes in current, but they can’t pass continuous direct current, the spring can only stretch so far.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Inductors resist change in current, they want the current to keep doing what it’s doing, like a spinning wheel.

Among other things this can be used to remove high frequency noise, the noise is rapid changes in the current and the inductor wants to keep the current consistent.

Meanwhile capacitors are more like springs. They can be pushed or pulled away from their neutral point but only so far. When they are away from the neutral point they want to return to it, releasing that stored energy.

Unlike inductors they don’t mind rapid changes in current, but they can’t pass continuous direct current, the spring can only stretch so far.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Inductors resist change in current, they want the current to keep doing what it’s doing, like a spinning wheel.

Among other things this can be used to remove high frequency noise, the noise is rapid changes in the current and the inductor wants to keep the current consistent.

Meanwhile capacitors are more like springs. They can be pushed or pulled away from their neutral point but only so far. When they are away from the neutral point they want to return to it, releasing that stored energy.

Unlike inductors they don’t mind rapid changes in current, but they can’t pass continuous direct current, the spring can only stretch so far.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Following should be correct for AC:
Voltage and Current are Bound together in the same Sinus Curve. Up and down together.
One complete Circle would be 360° but an Inductor (Motor) would shift the Current 90° after the Voltage. This brings some loss in energy.
To counter that effect you can use Capacitors which shift the Current 90° before the Voltage.

Depending on the Use Case (Motor) both will be used to Offset each other and increase efficiency.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Following should be correct for AC:
Voltage and Current are Bound together in the same Sinus Curve. Up and down together.
One complete Circle would be 360° but an Inductor (Motor) would shift the Current 90° after the Voltage. This brings some loss in energy.
To counter that effect you can use Capacitors which shift the Current 90° before the Voltage.

Depending on the Use Case (Motor) both will be used to Offset each other and increase efficiency.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Following should be correct for AC:
Voltage and Current are Bound together in the same Sinus Curve. Up and down together.
One complete Circle would be 360° but an Inductor (Motor) would shift the Current 90° after the Voltage. This brings some loss in energy.
To counter that effect you can use Capacitors which shift the Current 90° before the Voltage.

Depending on the Use Case (Motor) both will be used to Offset each other and increase efficiency.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Water analogy: capacitor is a water filled balloon. It will resist sudden changes in pressure by absorbing it until full. It can store energy by trying to maintain pressure. Inductor is a very long piece of garden hose. You can change pressure all you like, but it will resist sudden changes in *flow*. This resistance to flow change can he used as energy storage by building up momentum.