Do Black Holes have a front and back, or can they be entered from all sides?

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Whenever I see pictures of black holes warping space time, it looks like a sink hole sucking matter in. So, hypothetically, if you were to approach it does it just look the same from all sides, or face a certain direction?

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24 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

The event horizon is a 3D object. The surrounding matter would look different to you depending on the viewing angle, but the event horizon itself would probably look like an object coated in vantablack. While it is 3D, you wouldn’t be able to make out features due to the lack of structure.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The event horizon is a 3D object. The surrounding matter would look different to you depending on the viewing angle, but the event horizon itself would probably look like an object coated in vantablack. While it is 3D, you wouldn’t be able to make out features due to the lack of structure.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The event horizon is a 3D object. The surrounding matter would look different to you depending on the viewing angle, but the event horizon itself would probably look like an object coated in vantablack. While it is 3D, you wouldn’t be able to make out features due to the lack of structure.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Can be entered from all sides.

Some of them spin quite quickly, and that causes gravitational waves. Meaning you could very well die from the gravity waves ripping you to shreds, long before a slow spinning black hole would

Matter falling in generally happens in a plane, or a disk actually, and generally spins the same direction as the blackhole is spinning.

This is due to conservation of angular momentum. When stars or dust get captured by a black hole, when they interact gravitationally enough with other captured matter or the black hole itself, the net effect results in the average direction of spin direction and speed. We see this same behaviour in most star systems, and even galaxies.

Now what you see around the black hole is basically just gas that is falling close to the even horizon, the point of no return for matter, but not quite reaching it. As it falls in it gets faster, as it gets faster and bumps into to other gas, knocking it in but escaping and going into a higher energy state, booting some electrons out causing there to be free electrons in the mix, therefore the gas becomes a plasma, and it glows.

Now a consequence of the fast hot moving plasma is that it has that electric charge due to the higher energy state knocking electrons free. Now fundamentally, electricity and magnetism are two sides of the same thing. So anyways moving charged particles through space causes massive electromagnetic effects that can create astrophysical jets at the poles of the black hole.

These jets of hot plasma can be up to lightyears across, and generally indicate that a black hole has been actively ripping stars apart as they fall in for quite some time.

Otherwise black holes are largely featureless.

They are just so much mass concentrated at one point, that space and time is distorted around them. There is a region near the black holes that light cannot escape, we call it the event horizon, a boundary at which we see nothing beyond, even at the highest speed possible the speed of light, gravitational distortion is so great, that there are no paths that light can take to escape. So from those regions we see nothing. Pure blackness, with some stuff in between usually.

Next we would also see light that wraps around the black hole, up to several times. Actual space is just being distorted that much, that it is wrapping around the black hole is a straight line.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Illustration like [this](https://i.stack.imgur.com/B5szS.jpg) are a way where you try to use 3D to show the curvature 2D area of space. It is a bit if you illustrate the shape of the earth with just a circle, not a sphere.

Images like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Black_hole_-_Messier_87_crop_max_res.jpg have the black hole in the middle. What is seen is the accretion disk of matter that orbit the black hole. You can compare it to the rings around Jupiter.

The accretion disk is a disk because if stuff orbited in all directions there would be lots of collisions. It is the collision and other interactions that result in that it ends up in a single disc. There is not a lot of difference in the orbital plane of planes in our solar system for the

Even if you look at the Accretion disk from the side you will see a dark center with light around it. The reason is black holes bend light so that you can see the accretion disk behind the black hole, the light have bend around.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Illustration like [this](https://i.stack.imgur.com/B5szS.jpg) are a way where you try to use 3D to show the curvature 2D area of space. It is a bit if you illustrate the shape of the earth with just a circle, not a sphere.

Images like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Black_hole_-_Messier_87_crop_max_res.jpg have the black hole in the middle. What is seen is the accretion disk of matter that orbit the black hole. You can compare it to the rings around Jupiter.

The accretion disk is a disk because if stuff orbited in all directions there would be lots of collisions. It is the collision and other interactions that result in that it ends up in a single disc. There is not a lot of difference in the orbital plane of planes in our solar system for the

Even if you look at the Accretion disk from the side you will see a dark center with light around it. The reason is black holes bend light so that you can see the accretion disk behind the black hole, the light have bend around.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There isn’t an ‘entrance’ or an ‘exit’ from a black hole. Like any object whose structure is shaped by gravity, the black hole itself is a perfectly spherical object and would look the same from any angle. Think of a planet – does it have a front or a back? No, it doesn’t. No one spot on a planet can claim to be any more frontal than any other.

If you were approaching an actively ‘feeding’ black hole, however, then the structure of gases surrounding it *would* look different depending on the angle you were approaching it from. Due to the way that rotating matter behaves, it would spread out in a disk around the black hole.

So if you were approaching it from the “top” or “bottom”, it would look like a large rotating disk, changing in color as the gases speed up while getting closer to the black hole. From the “sides” it would look like a thin disk with a bulge in the center. And depending on the exact characteristics of the black hole, you might also see high-energy jets shooting out perpendicular to the disk.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Can be entered from all sides.

Some of them spin quite quickly, and that causes gravitational waves. Meaning you could very well die from the gravity waves ripping you to shreds, long before a slow spinning black hole would

Matter falling in generally happens in a plane, or a disk actually, and generally spins the same direction as the blackhole is spinning.

This is due to conservation of angular momentum. When stars or dust get captured by a black hole, when they interact gravitationally enough with other captured matter or the black hole itself, the net effect results in the average direction of spin direction and speed. We see this same behaviour in most star systems, and even galaxies.

Now what you see around the black hole is basically just gas that is falling close to the even horizon, the point of no return for matter, but not quite reaching it. As it falls in it gets faster, as it gets faster and bumps into to other gas, knocking it in but escaping and going into a higher energy state, booting some electrons out causing there to be free electrons in the mix, therefore the gas becomes a plasma, and it glows.

Now a consequence of the fast hot moving plasma is that it has that electric charge due to the higher energy state knocking electrons free. Now fundamentally, electricity and magnetism are two sides of the same thing. So anyways moving charged particles through space causes massive electromagnetic effects that can create astrophysical jets at the poles of the black hole.

These jets of hot plasma can be up to lightyears across, and generally indicate that a black hole has been actively ripping stars apart as they fall in for quite some time.

Otherwise black holes are largely featureless.

They are just so much mass concentrated at one point, that space and time is distorted around them. There is a region near the black holes that light cannot escape, we call it the event horizon, a boundary at which we see nothing beyond, even at the highest speed possible the speed of light, gravitational distortion is so great, that there are no paths that light can take to escape. So from those regions we see nothing. Pure blackness, with some stuff in between usually.

Next we would also see light that wraps around the black hole, up to several times. Actual space is just being distorted that much, that it is wrapping around the black hole is a straight line.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There isn’t an ‘entrance’ or an ‘exit’ from a black hole. Like any object whose structure is shaped by gravity, the black hole itself is a perfectly spherical object and would look the same from any angle. Think of a planet – does it have a front or a back? No, it doesn’t. No one spot on a planet can claim to be any more frontal than any other.

If you were approaching an actively ‘feeding’ black hole, however, then the structure of gases surrounding it *would* look different depending on the angle you were approaching it from. Due to the way that rotating matter behaves, it would spread out in a disk around the black hole.

So if you were approaching it from the “top” or “bottom”, it would look like a large rotating disk, changing in color as the gases speed up while getting closer to the black hole. From the “sides” it would look like a thin disk with a bulge in the center. And depending on the exact characteristics of the black hole, you might also see high-energy jets shooting out perpendicular to the disk.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Can be entered from all sides.

Some of them spin quite quickly, and that causes gravitational waves. Meaning you could very well die from the gravity waves ripping you to shreds, long before a slow spinning black hole would

Matter falling in generally happens in a plane, or a disk actually, and generally spins the same direction as the blackhole is spinning.

This is due to conservation of angular momentum. When stars or dust get captured by a black hole, when they interact gravitationally enough with other captured matter or the black hole itself, the net effect results in the average direction of spin direction and speed. We see this same behaviour in most star systems, and even galaxies.

Now what you see around the black hole is basically just gas that is falling close to the even horizon, the point of no return for matter, but not quite reaching it. As it falls in it gets faster, as it gets faster and bumps into to other gas, knocking it in but escaping and going into a higher energy state, booting some electrons out causing there to be free electrons in the mix, therefore the gas becomes a plasma, and it glows.

Now a consequence of the fast hot moving plasma is that it has that electric charge due to the higher energy state knocking electrons free. Now fundamentally, electricity and magnetism are two sides of the same thing. So anyways moving charged particles through space causes massive electromagnetic effects that can create astrophysical jets at the poles of the black hole.

These jets of hot plasma can be up to lightyears across, and generally indicate that a black hole has been actively ripping stars apart as they fall in for quite some time.

Otherwise black holes are largely featureless.

They are just so much mass concentrated at one point, that space and time is distorted around them. There is a region near the black holes that light cannot escape, we call it the event horizon, a boundary at which we see nothing beyond, even at the highest speed possible the speed of light, gravitational distortion is so great, that there are no paths that light can take to escape. So from those regions we see nothing. Pure blackness, with some stuff in between usually.

Next we would also see light that wraps around the black hole, up to several times. Actual space is just being distorted that much, that it is wrapping around the black hole is a straight line.