Eli5: how do magnitizers and demagnetizers work on hand tools and why isn’t it permanent ?

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Eli5: how do magnitizers and demagnetizers work on hand tools and why isn’t it permanent ?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Magnets is your answer. They can lose their magnetism over time especially if exposed to extreme temperatures and/or dropped, hit, etc.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Magnets is your answer. They can lose their magnetism over time especially if exposed to extreme temperatures and/or dropped, hit, etc.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Magnets is your answer. They can lose their magnetism over time especially if exposed to extreme temperatures and/or dropped, hit, etc.

Anonymous 0 Comments

So with pieces of Iron and other ferromagnetic metals you get the molecules forming tiny magnets on their own. We just don’t notice because all the tiny magnets are pointed random directions and the magnetism all cancels out. If they do start lining up you get a magnet.

You can actually manipulate these molecular magnets with electric currents and magnetic fields with Magnitizers lining them up and demagnetizers scrambling them.

Anonymous 0 Comments

So with pieces of Iron and other ferromagnetic metals you get the molecules forming tiny magnets on their own. We just don’t notice because all the tiny magnets are pointed random directions and the magnetism all cancels out. If they do start lining up you get a magnet.

You can actually manipulate these molecular magnets with electric currents and magnetic fields with Magnitizers lining them up and demagnetizers scrambling them.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Permanent magnetism arises from a bunch of things being aligned, starting with electrons. Each electron is like its own tiny magnet, but they’re usually all paired up so they cancel out. Those that aren’t paired are usually pointed in random directions, still canceling each other out. In a permanent magnet, they’re aligned so they work together.

Moreover, there are many regions within the crystal of the metal that may not be lined up and end up canceling each other out. So those need to be lined up, too.

You can create a permanent magnet by putting the metal into a strong magnetic field, which forces the electrons and regions to line up with that field, which lines them up together. You can demagnetize the metal by rapidly switching a strong magnetic field. The electrons and regions end up getting scrambled as they try to flip around and can’t keep up.

You can also bang on it really hard or heat the metal. Both will cause the electrons and regions to get mixed up again.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Permanent magnetism arises from a bunch of things being aligned, starting with electrons. Each electron is like its own tiny magnet, but they’re usually all paired up so they cancel out. Those that aren’t paired are usually pointed in random directions, still canceling each other out. In a permanent magnet, they’re aligned so they work together.

Moreover, there are many regions within the crystal of the metal that may not be lined up and end up canceling each other out. So those need to be lined up, too.

You can create a permanent magnet by putting the metal into a strong magnetic field, which forces the electrons and regions to line up with that field, which lines them up together. You can demagnetize the metal by rapidly switching a strong magnetic field. The electrons and regions end up getting scrambled as they try to flip around and can’t keep up.

You can also bang on it really hard or heat the metal. Both will cause the electrons and regions to get mixed up again.

Anonymous 0 Comments

So with pieces of Iron and other ferromagnetic metals you get the molecules forming tiny magnets on their own. We just don’t notice because all the tiny magnets are pointed random directions and the magnetism all cancels out. If they do start lining up you get a magnet.

You can actually manipulate these molecular magnets with electric currents and magnetic fields with Magnitizers lining them up and demagnetizers scrambling them.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Permanent magnetism arises from a bunch of things being aligned, starting with electrons. Each electron is like its own tiny magnet, but they’re usually all paired up so they cancel out. Those that aren’t paired are usually pointed in random directions, still canceling each other out. In a permanent magnet, they’re aligned so they work together.

Moreover, there are many regions within the crystal of the metal that may not be lined up and end up canceling each other out. So those need to be lined up, too.

You can create a permanent magnet by putting the metal into a strong magnetic field, which forces the electrons and regions to line up with that field, which lines them up together. You can demagnetize the metal by rapidly switching a strong magnetic field. The electrons and regions end up getting scrambled as they try to flip around and can’t keep up.

You can also bang on it really hard or heat the metal. Both will cause the electrons and regions to get mixed up again.