Eli5 how doesn‘t apple lightning cable shock me?

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Since pins on both sides are in reach, can be touched and usually are connected to a wallcharger with enough AMP to kill a human.

Would it be safe to touch both sides with one hand? With wet fingers?
Does the charger somehow communicate with the device before sending current?

Edit: I am in Europe so having 230V50hz, Charger is the classic 12W 2.4Amp USBA one.

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15 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

While some chargers do communicate about how much power to send, the voltage produced is just not high enough to pass through you skin to your heart. One thing to remember is current is PULLED not pushed. Voltage is the part of electricity that pushes, so if the voltage is low going through something with high resistance, it pulls very little current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

While some chargers do communicate about how much power to send, the voltage produced is just not high enough to pass through you skin to your heart. One thing to remember is current is PULLED not pushed. Voltage is the part of electricity that pushes, so if the voltage is low going through something with high resistance, it pulls very little current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s a low voltage, so it tries to shock you, but just doesn’t have enough oomph.
You can sometimes feel it if you lick your lips and place the charger between them (with the contacts on your wetted lips).
Warning: do at your own risk, shouldn’t hurt but also I’m not a professional. Just personal experience.

Anonymous 0 Comments

While some chargers do communicate about how much power to send, the voltage produced is just not high enough to pass through you skin to your heart. One thing to remember is current is PULLED not pushed. Voltage is the part of electricity that pushes, so if the voltage is low going through something with high resistance, it pulls very little current.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s a low voltage, so it tries to shock you, but just doesn’t have enough oomph.
You can sometimes feel it if you lick your lips and place the charger between them (with the contacts on your wetted lips).
Warning: do at your own risk, shouldn’t hurt but also I’m not a professional. Just personal experience.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The block that you plug into the wall converts the big potentially dangerous amount of energy down to make only a small (safe) amount available to the cord to charge the phone. I think the voltage is reduced to 5 volts DC or thereabouts.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s a low voltage, so it tries to shock you, but just doesn’t have enough oomph.
You can sometimes feel it if you lick your lips and place the charger between them (with the contacts on your wetted lips).
Warning: do at your own risk, shouldn’t hurt but also I’m not a professional. Just personal experience.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Honestly, with a dry body, you probably wouldn’t even feel anything below 30 volts or so. USB (which is what is carried on that cable) defaults to 5 volts. Your body is far too resistive of electricity for that to do anything you’d notice.

I have an iPad whose charger only does 5.1 volts, so it’s not going any higher. If yours is 2.4 amps at 12 watts, 12/2.4 = 5 volts as well.

You can’t force low voltages to go through things if the resistance is too high, and human skin has pretty high resistance. A car battery can output 400+ amps but at only 12 volts, it’s completely safe to touch both terminals of the battery as long as you’re dry. The battery *can’t* push all those amps because your body isn’t taking it, any more than it can push them through the open air if nothing were connected to them.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The block that you plug into the wall converts the big potentially dangerous amount of energy down to make only a small (safe) amount available to the cord to charge the phone. I think the voltage is reduced to 5 volts DC or thereabouts.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Honestly, with a dry body, you probably wouldn’t even feel anything below 30 volts or so. USB (which is what is carried on that cable) defaults to 5 volts. Your body is far too resistive of electricity for that to do anything you’d notice.

I have an iPad whose charger only does 5.1 volts, so it’s not going any higher. If yours is 2.4 amps at 12 watts, 12/2.4 = 5 volts as well.

You can’t force low voltages to go through things if the resistance is too high, and human skin has pretty high resistance. A car battery can output 400+ amps but at only 12 volts, it’s completely safe to touch both terminals of the battery as long as you’re dry. The battery *can’t* push all those amps because your body isn’t taking it, any more than it can push them through the open air if nothing were connected to them.