Eli5 how internet on cruise ships is so slow, but they get live tv from satellites without issue

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I was just on a cruise ship and the reason they said internet is so slow is because it comes from satellites, but we can watch live tv from satellites without buffering or any issues? Why is video so much better than internet

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24 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet requires a bidirectional connection and the contents are specific for each user.

With television, a passive signal that’s the same for all viewers can be used.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet requires a bidirectional connection and the contents are specific for each user.

With television, a passive signal that’s the same for all viewers can be used.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Getting TV from a satellite is one directional. Internet requires you to send data in both directions (requests and responses)

It’s also often less compressable since it’s encrypted data. Some stuff gets compressed before encryption but not everything

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet is 2-way communication. You need to send as well as receive for it to be useful. And of course, you’re competing with everybody at once on the ship.

TV is 1-way. You are receiving. Nothing more. Just point the dish as the right satellite and you’re fine. All TV signals are coming down, you just need to split them out, and send duplicates to whatever TV wants that channel. You can often take advantage of existing TV technology with digital cable, just sending the video down a long cable split off at each location as if it were its own neighbourhood on solid ground.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet is 2-way communication. You need to send as well as receive for it to be useful. And of course, you’re competing with everybody at once on the ship.

TV is 1-way. You are receiving. Nothing more. Just point the dish as the right satellite and you’re fine. All TV signals are coming down, you just need to split them out, and send duplicates to whatever TV wants that channel. You can often take advantage of existing TV technology with digital cable, just sending the video down a long cable split off at each location as if it were its own neighbourhood on solid ground.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Getting TV from a satellite is one directional. Internet requires you to send data in both directions (requests and responses)

It’s also often less compressable since it’s encrypted data. Some stuff gets compressed before encryption but not everything

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet requires a bidirectional connection and the contents are specific for each user.

With television, a passive signal that’s the same for all viewers can be used.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Internet is 2-way communication. You need to send as well as receive for it to be useful. And of course, you’re competing with everybody at once on the ship.

TV is 1-way. You are receiving. Nothing more. Just point the dish as the right satellite and you’re fine. All TV signals are coming down, you just need to split them out, and send duplicates to whatever TV wants that channel. You can often take advantage of existing TV technology with digital cable, just sending the video down a long cable split off at each location as if it were its own neighbourhood on solid ground.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Getting TV from a satellite is one directional. Internet requires you to send data in both directions (requests and responses)

It’s also often less compressable since it’s encrypted data. Some stuff gets compressed before encryption but not everything

Anonymous 0 Comments

As stated the tv signal is one way so it is more efficient that two way communication. To ad to that internet coms require multiple servers all processing those requests which adds to the lag time. The “live TV” you watch on the cruise ship is actually delayed by a few seconds to create a cache to reduce any “buffering” during a short loss of signal.