Eli5: What happens when a lighting goes off?

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I mean, what happens to the immediate area of the lighting? In the “openness” basically…

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8 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Lighting as in “what happens to light when a light sources is turned off” or lightning as in “what happens when lightening strikes from a thunderstorm?”

Anonymous 0 Comments

Lighting as in “what happens to light when a light sources is turned off” or lightning as in “what happens when lightening strikes from a thunderstorm?”

Anonymous 0 Comments

Lighting is an incredibly hot stream of electrons, which jump through the sky. As the electrons travel and pass through air, they superheat the air molecules around them. This heating causes the air to expand very quickly, and this expansion is heard as thunder.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Lighting is an incredibly hot stream of electrons, which jump through the sky. As the electrons travel and pass through air, they superheat the air molecules around them. This heating causes the air to expand very quickly, and this expansion is heard as thunder.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I was once in Florida during a thunderstorm with the most lightning I’ve ever seen. I was unhitching a uhaul trailer from my truck and lightning struck close enough several times that the trailer shocked me several times. It didn’t feel good

Anonymous 0 Comments

I was once in Florida during a thunderstorm with the most lightning I’ve ever seen. I was unhitching a uhaul trailer from my truck and lightning struck close enough several times that the trailer shocked me several times. It didn’t feel good

Anonymous 0 Comments

The lightning bolt is “plasma” – basically, the air has been heated to a point where it’s a phase of matter even beyond gas. The quick appearance and disappearance of that plasma, along with the immense amount of heat it generates, causes the air around the plasma to rapidly heat and expand and then contract again, causing the sound of thunder.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The lightning bolt is “plasma” – basically, the air has been heated to a point where it’s a phase of matter even beyond gas. The quick appearance and disappearance of that plasma, along with the immense amount of heat it generates, causes the air around the plasma to rapidly heat and expand and then contract again, causing the sound of thunder.