How can someone who suffers from autism and struggling to form sentences change dramatically when they sing?

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How can someone who suffers from autism and struggling to form sentences change dramatically when they sing?

In: Biology

Singing and talking use different parts of the brain and the singing portion is better developed.

Not Autism, but I had a bad stutter when I was a teenager.

If you try to speak a sentence, you have to think of the words and then speak them. Sometimes I thought too fast, and got muddled up with my words, or changed my mind of what I was going to say and my mouth didn’t catch up.

With singing, the words are already there so you don’t have to think about them, you just have to follow the pattern. The pitch and speed usually flows at the same speed.

Depends on people’s comfort zones.

When I’m doing something I’m good at or I’m with a good friend. I talk with much more confidence.

Autism means reduced social skills. When we are talking, we’re not just exchanging information, it’s also a social action – which a person with autism underperforms, because his or her social skills are weaker than a neurotypical person’s. He or she has difficulties understanding other’s intent, doesn’t know how to move the conversation on, perhaps, doesn’t even recognize the situation, and just walks away in the middle of a conversation.

Singing is not a social action. Once you know the lyrics, you just can’t miss it. No social skills are needed.