How did primitive tribes learn about sanitation? How did they learn that fecal matter near a water supply was bad?

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Was everyone just sick all the time? How did they keep everyone from dying?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Primitive tribes basically learned to keep things clean by seein’ what happens when they don’t. If they poop too close to their water supply, they might get sick and die. So, they learned over time that it’s super important to keep things clean and not let their waste get too close to where they get their water or they get sick.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It probably literally smells and tastes like shit, and bad smells repel most creatures, as they rely on their senses and instincts to keep them alive.

The ones that drink it anyway and survive, if they understand the source, which could take repeated exposer to increasingly dangerous waters, dont want to feel sick again, and will stop/protect their loved ones from doing it.

They would likely notice animals with stronger senses of smell avoiding the water, or even possibly find corpses of small hunting animals who ate other animals that were poisoned/sick from the water.

Wise elders were once respected leaders and the teachers, and after a few years under your belt, you tend to notice patterns.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Primitive tribes basically learned to keep things clean by seein’ what happens when they don’t. If they poop too close to their water supply, they might get sick and die. So, they learned over time that it’s super important to keep things clean and not let their waste get too close to where they get their water or they get sick.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It probably literally smells and tastes like shit, and bad smells repel most creatures, as they rely on their senses and instincts to keep them alive.

The ones that drink it anyway and survive, if they understand the source, which could take repeated exposer to increasingly dangerous waters, dont want to feel sick again, and will stop/protect their loved ones from doing it.

They would likely notice animals with stronger senses of smell avoiding the water, or even possibly find corpses of small hunting animals who ate other animals that were poisoned/sick from the water.

Wise elders were once respected leaders and the teachers, and after a few years under your belt, you tend to notice patterns.

Anonymous 0 Comments

One way primitive people learned things was via semi-random religious beliefs. The religions with more helpful beliefs out-competed the others because the believers were more prosperous and then others noticed this and concluded the gods favored those with those beliefs and either joined that religion or incorporated those beliefs into their own religion. Knowledge at it’s core is a set of helpful beliefs, we could be totally wrong all that matters is the benefits. Believe.

Anonymous 0 Comments

One way primitive people learned things was via semi-random religious beliefs. The religions with more helpful beliefs out-competed the others because the believers were more prosperous and then others noticed this and concluded the gods favored those with those beliefs and either joined that religion or incorporated those beliefs into their own religion. Knowledge at it’s core is a set of helpful beliefs, we could be totally wrong all that matters is the benefits. Believe.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Primitive tribes most likely didn’t figure it out. It took us until [1854](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1854_Broad_Street_cholera_outbreak) to figure out the connection between poop contaminated drinking water and a cholera outbreak. Prior to that, the most popular theory was that diseases were spread and caused by what they called miasma, or foul smelling air.

Anonymous 0 Comments

They didn’t learn. Half of third world still hasn’t learned. And yes, it means a lot of sickness and early deaths. There’s a reason average fertility rates used to be like 6-8 children per woman, yet world population remained pretty stagnant for thousands of years and that reason involved a lot of dead children.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Primitive tribes most likely didn’t figure it out. It took us until [1854](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1854_Broad_Street_cholera_outbreak) to figure out the connection between poop contaminated drinking water and a cholera outbreak. Prior to that, the most popular theory was that diseases were spread and caused by what they called miasma, or foul smelling air.

Anonymous 0 Comments

They didn’t learn. Half of third world still hasn’t learned. And yes, it means a lot of sickness and early deaths. There’s a reason average fertility rates used to be like 6-8 children per woman, yet world population remained pretty stagnant for thousands of years and that reason involved a lot of dead children.