How do beta blockers like bisoprolol actually work?

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If they work by only hindering the effect of epinephrine/adrenaline on the heart then why wouldnt everyone take them? Seems like the perfect drug.

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9 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

From Wikipedia:
>The primary antihypertensive mechanism of beta blockers is unclear, but may involve reduction in cardiac output (due to negative chronotropic and inotropic effects).[77] It may also be due to reduction in renin release from the kidneys, and a central nervous system effect to reduce sympathetic activity (for those beta blockers that do cross the blood–brain barrier, e.g. propranolol).

So it seems Beta blockers are one of those drugs that we know work, we just don’t really know how it works (there are a surprising number of such medicines). Well we may not know the specific mechanism of action, ultimately beta blockers cause a reduction in the stimulation of the B1 (Beta1) cell receptor, which is the receptor cells use to detect epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine. This is why we call them beta blockers.

Not everyone stands to benefit from blocking adrenaline receptors, and all medications have the potential for side effects. Why introduce extra risk with no benefit by having people take a medicine they don’t benefit from?

Anonymous 0 Comments

From Wikipedia:
>The primary antihypertensive mechanism of beta blockers is unclear, but may involve reduction in cardiac output (due to negative chronotropic and inotropic effects).[77] It may also be due to reduction in renin release from the kidneys, and a central nervous system effect to reduce sympathetic activity (for those beta blockers that do cross the blood–brain barrier, e.g. propranolol).

So it seems Beta blockers are one of those drugs that we know work, we just don’t really know how it works (there are a surprising number of such medicines). Well we may not know the specific mechanism of action, ultimately beta blockers cause a reduction in the stimulation of the B1 (Beta1) cell receptor, which is the receptor cells use to detect epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine. This is why we call them beta blockers.

Not everyone stands to benefit from blocking adrenaline receptors, and all medications have the potential for side effects. Why introduce extra risk with no benefit by having people take a medicine they don’t benefit from?

Anonymous 0 Comments

bisoprolol works by blocking the effects of adrenaline on the heart and blood vessels, leading to a decrease in heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiac output. This can be beneficial for people with conditions such as hypertension, angina, and heart failure, and can help to reduce the risk of heart-related complications.

Anonymous 0 Comments

bisoprolol works by blocking the effects of adrenaline on the heart and blood vessels, leading to a decrease in heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiac output. This can be beneficial for people with conditions such as hypertension, angina, and heart failure, and can help to reduce the risk of heart-related complications.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s basically right there in the name. The block the beta adrenergic receptors which stops the heart from beating as fast or hard. Blocking a certain receptor is a very common way in which drugs work.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s basically right there in the name. The block the beta adrenergic receptors which stops the heart from beating as fast or hard. Blocking a certain receptor is a very common way in which drugs work.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As you have stated, beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline on the heart, causing it to beat slower. This allows the heart to fill up a bit more before it contracts and is great if an abnormally fast heart is the problem.

As for why why everyone wouldn’t take them, it is because they will make it almost impossible to exercise. Adrenaline released during exercise stimulates the heart to beat faster and harder, allowing you to send sufficient blood to muscles. Stopping everyone from exercising is generally not a good outcome.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As you have stated, beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline on the heart, causing it to beat slower. This allows the heart to fill up a bit more before it contracts and is great if an abnormally fast heart is the problem.

As for why why everyone wouldn’t take them, it is because they will make it almost impossible to exercise. Adrenaline released during exercise stimulates the heart to beat faster and harder, allowing you to send sufficient blood to muscles. Stopping everyone from exercising is generally not a good outcome.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As you have stated, beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline on the heart, causing it to beat slower. This allows the heart to fill up a bit more before it contracts and is great if an abnormally fast heart is the problem.

As for why why everyone wouldn’t take them, it is because they will make it almost impossible to exercise. Adrenaline released during exercise stimulates the heart to beat faster and harder, allowing you to send sufficient blood to muscles. Stopping everyone from exercising is generally not a good outcome.