How do medical facilities (hospitals, out patients, plastic surgery facilities, etc) dispose of things like body parts that are amputated, or skin that has been removed etc?

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How do medical facilities (hospitals, out patients, plastic surgery facilities, etc) dispose of things like body parts that are amputated, or skin that has been removed etc?

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Often it’s incinerated. Maybe the places which don’t do it themselves ship the red hazmat bags to a commercial facility which does the job.

I think there are provisions for if a patient wants to retain their tissue, but it’s not common except for miscarriage.

There are whole companies that do medical waste disposal. As others have said, Tissues are collected and hauled off for incineration…around here hospitals rarely do it on site.

Stuff that isn’t tissue, but comes in contact with blood or other potentially infectious material is collected in containers labeled biohazard. If it’s trash like syringes and gloves is ground up and autoclaved (baked at a really high heat until it’s decontaminated.) then thrown in a landfill.

They are disposed of in specific “biohazard” freezers and bins then usually sent to an incinerator and cremated

If you’re persistent enough you can keep it. I tried encasing my finger tip in resin but messed it up and ended up ruining it… It would have been cool if I had practiced a few times on other shit before trying with the finger lol

They throw them in the biohazard bin. Fluids are stabilized with a powder that converts them to a gel to prevent leakage and thus accidental exposure when handling then they get tossed into the biohazard as well. Boxes of biohazard waste are stacked up until a collection company comes and throws them all into the truck where they’re transported to an incinerator.

I use to mark the boxes to warn the drivers when they contained infectious, antibiotic resistant material such as MRSA. But then a driver started freaking out and complaining that they had to handle such material, no matter that it’s their literal job. So I quit marking the boxes, as they are required to handle all the material under maximum precaution anyway.

I had a friend who worked as a ‘transport aide’ in an anatomy lab at a medical school that was attached to a hospital. The organizations had an agreement: amputated body parts, as well as whole corpses that were either pre-designated to the med school, or unclaimed after a period of time, went to the anatomy lab so med students could learn from them. His job was to transport these items from the hospital to the med school lab.

Usually by incenartion. Although most smaller hospitals (where it wouldn’t be usual to have any surgery or what have you) have a clinical waste service that collects the bloodstained bandages/spiled bedsheets and disposes of then safely.