How do people learn skills that are absolutely deadly when executed sub-perfectly and don’t seem to have a set of easier to learn sub-processes to connect later?

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You know how for example there are people who can stop their heart through willpower and then reboot it after a while? How did they ever learn to make it start beating again, seeing as it not beating seems like a prerequisite for it. Would be a shame if you couldn’t get it back to beating after the first time you successfully stopped, no?

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Survivor bias. People who got it wrong are dead so you never hear about them having that skill.

I’m not sure how many skills are truly deadly when you have the proper precautions around…presumably if you’re trying to learn to stop your heart you have your EMT friend around with a defibrilator, but if it truly is deadly then you either get it right and you’re known for that skill, or nobody ever hears of your because you aren’t around anymore.

Specifically for your example, humans cannot voluntarily stop their heart from beating. The heart regulates its own rhythm, and it will maintain it regardless of what we do.

It is possible to *slow down* our heart rate through conscious control, which certainly takes a lot of practice. But as for stopping it, there’s no scientific evidence to support that.

>You know how for example there are people who can stop their heart through willpower and then reboot it after a while?

Literally nobody can do this; anytime you hear that they’re “stopping their heart,” it’s a media company sensationalizing what they do in order to draw in viewership.

Granted, it’s possible to slow the heart and survive extremes through willpower, but it’s all trainable by gradually preparing the body for adverse conditions in advance of actually pulling off a given stunt.

I was just wondering about this watching a video of someone “flying” in a wing suit. How do they learn to do that?

The medical term for stopping your own heart is “suicide”.

You can train yourself to *slow* your heart rate. But a stopped heart = dead.