how do they get dry Ice to freeze?

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I understand that dry ice is just frozen co2, but how do they get the dry ice to those extremely low temperatures? I tried googling it but no satisfying answers came up. Can someone explain?

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8 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you take carbon dioxide and pressurize it, it will heat up.

If you take carbon dioxide at a high pressure and release the pressure it cools off.

So what you do is pressurize carbon dioxide then let it cool off using heat exchangers to dump the heat produced. Then you release the pressure and it cools off enough to turn solid

Anonymous 0 Comments

By butting it in a compressor. Things don’t freeze just when they get cold. In order to freeze something you need to get the molecules close enough together to from a crystal. You can do this by cooling it down or compressing it.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you take carbon dioxide and pressurize it, it will heat up.

If you take carbon dioxide at a high pressure and release the pressure it cools off.

So what you do is pressurize carbon dioxide then let it cool off using heat exchangers to dump the heat produced. Then you release the pressure and it cools off enough to turn solid

Anonymous 0 Comments

By butting it in a compressor. Things don’t freeze just when they get cold. In order to freeze something you need to get the molecules close enough together to from a crystal. You can do this by cooling it down or compressing it.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As per the other answers, it is achieved through compression of the gas.

Through a process known as Charles’s Law, temperature increases as gas is compressed. The gas is then cooled and then decompressed, which has the opposite effect of compression, cooling and contracting the gas.

In addition to being the process used in refrigeration and most air conditioning, this process is used to liquefy a range of gases (such as liquid nitrogen). However, since Carbon Dioxide doesn’t really have a liquid state, it produces a solid instead.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As per the other answers, it is achieved through compression of the gas.

Through a process known as Charles’s Law, temperature increases as gas is compressed. The gas is then cooled and then decompressed, which has the opposite effect of compression, cooling and contracting the gas.

In addition to being the process used in refrigeration and most air conditioning, this process is used to liquefy a range of gases (such as liquid nitrogen). However, since Carbon Dioxide doesn’t really have a liquid state, it produces a solid instead.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The compression is used to make liquid co2. Dry ice is almost exclusively made from liquified co2. Moving co2 around as ice or gas (usually) doesn’t make sense is the reason.

At atmospheric pressure, liquified co2 turns to dry ice. It’s pretty simple stuff. It’ll spray out of a liquid tank as snow. It’s an instant conversion! You can also have co2 slush, which sounds fun but is a bad day to have if it happens.

My background is cryogenics, co2 isn’t really cryogenic by definition, but it’s cold enough it was in job scope.

It’s basically all food grade, even if there’s no testing papers along side of it. It has about 3x the cooling power of regular ice, doesn’t leave water behind and you can source it easily with a little search from places like walmart.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The compression is used to make liquid co2. Dry ice is almost exclusively made from liquified co2. Moving co2 around as ice or gas (usually) doesn’t make sense is the reason.

At atmospheric pressure, liquified co2 turns to dry ice. It’s pretty simple stuff. It’ll spray out of a liquid tank as snow. It’s an instant conversion! You can also have co2 slush, which sounds fun but is a bad day to have if it happens.

My background is cryogenics, co2 isn’t really cryogenic by definition, but it’s cold enough it was in job scope.

It’s basically all food grade, even if there’s no testing papers along side of it. It has about 3x the cooling power of regular ice, doesn’t leave water behind and you can source it easily with a little search from places like walmart.