If exercising means you strain muscles to grow them, why does straining your back hurt it instead of making it stronger?

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If exercising means you strain muscles to grow them, why does straining your back hurt it instead of making it stronger?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Straining your back happens when you push it past its physical limit.

If you regularly exercise your back, correctly, you will increase this limit over time.

Most people however, fail to properly exercise their back, whether doing nothing or doing way too much.

Doing Good Mornings are a great way to build your back, light overhead presses, pull ups and Lawnmowers.

Treat your back right and it will stay strong for a long time. Know your limits and try to exercise it a couple times per week, it doesn’t take much.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There is a fine line between exercising and straining. Sudden jolts of pressure, weird twisting, almost anything going wrong can cause damage to things like tendons, disks, etc.

If you work out carefully you do strengthen your back muscles instead of iinjuring them the same as your arm and leg muscles.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Typically, when you hurt your back, you hurt the joins between vertebrae precisely because you do not have enough muscle to support the weight. You need to workout your back so you grow those muscles. When you do that, you may be sore, but it won’t hurt like if you “hurt your back”

Anonymous 0 Comments

Strain for growing muscles is moving the muscle along it’s normal motion, with something resisting that motion. The motion is done repeatedly, usually until the person feels weak or cannot do the motion from weakness.

When you strain a muscle you are usually moving the muscle through a motion that is not normal, with too much resistance, and it’s usually only a single movement.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Its not the muscles that are damaged. Its the cartilage between the vertebrea (which is supposed to be spongey like the heel of an athletic shoe but once you blow out the rubber tube, its gone) and the nerves that branch out from the spine through those disks.

muscles adapt easier, even as we age, but when we get older all the other stuff doesn’t as much. tendons and connective tissue are much slower to respond and to heal.

the spine, as a fulcrum, takes on hundreds of pounds more effort to do something than the rest of you, that’s why they say lift from the knees not the back.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There’s a big difference between “stressing” a muscle and something non-muscle.
A muscle gets stressed and the body says “I need more muscle here” if it happens enough.
Your ligaments, bones and such just get damaged. The cartilage in your knee can’t be repaired. The disc in your back is more like a bag, over stress it and it deforms permanently

Anonymous 0 Comments

If a wrench is not meant to be used as a hammer, then why is it so convenient at it?

Just because you can do those movements, doesnt mean, they are ideal for you

It technically will make your back muscles stronger, but at the same time wrong movements can and will damage other tissues. Controlled movements, without taking on to much weight are actually very good at preventing those injuries.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Growth in muscle does require water, electrolytes and proper nutrition.

Straining or stressing a joint or muscle is a mechanical force and is time dependent.

Hurting and pain are dependent on each person’s tolerance and self awareness.

Anonymous 0 Comments

No one here is talking about the confusion people make between ” warming up ” and ” stretching”. Two different things. Most lower back injuries are made because of this. Poor blood circulation and bad posture. When u sit for a long time, you start stretching which is bad.

Anonymous 0 Comments

what do you mean by “back?” most back pain tho is from the spine which isn’t muscle at all.

And I don’t think “fine line between exercise and straining” is the answer you’re looking for because you literally refer to exercise as straining.