if I fly opposite the direction of the Earth’s rotation at the same speed of the rotation, will I stay in the same time of day as the days pass?

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How does time even work?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes you would, at least not accounting for the earth’s revolution around the sun. We tend to equate time with where we are in relation to the earth’s rotation (noon being about where the sun is at its highest point, midnight at its lowest) so if you moved to keep the sun at the same relative position, you would keep experiencing that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes you would, at least not accounting for the earth’s revolution around the sun. We tend to equate time with where we are in relation to the earth’s rotation (noon being about where the sun is at its highest point, midnight at its lowest) so if you moved to keep the sun at the same relative position, you would keep experiencing that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes you would, at least not accounting for the earth’s revolution around the sun. We tend to equate time with where we are in relation to the earth’s rotation (noon being about where the sun is at its highest point, midnight at its lowest) so if you moved to keep the sun at the same relative position, you would keep experiencing that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes. I’ve actually done this on a west-flying jet; it stayed just before sunset for 8 hours as we chased the sun. Another time the my plane had really good tailwinds on one leg of the journey and we got to celebrate new year’s twice during the flight.

Chasing the sun, it would be the same time until you hit the international date line, at which point it would suddenly be the next day at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes and no. You could keep the sun in the same relative position in the sky, so for example you could keep it high noon or at sunset indefinitely. You would of course need to fly at the speed of rotation *at your latitude* which is different at various latitudes.

You wouldn’t stay at the same time of day though because we standardized on time zones. In an ideal sense you would keep inside the same hour but while you are within a given time zone then officially that hour is passing normally, so for example you would go from 1:00AM to 1:59 AM then cross into the next time zone just in time for 1:00AM to start in that zone, etc. But of course the world isn’t ideal and the time zones aren’t perfectly regular as people shift them around for their convenience, so a cluster of islands doesn’t have a time zone running straight through them for example. This means you would actually tend to jump forward or backwards an hour periodically.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes. I’ve actually done this on a west-flying jet; it stayed just before sunset for 8 hours as we chased the sun. Another time the my plane had really good tailwinds on one leg of the journey and we got to celebrate new year’s twice during the flight.

Chasing the sun, it would be the same time until you hit the international date line, at which point it would suddenly be the next day at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes and no. You could keep the sun in the same relative position in the sky, so for example you could keep it high noon or at sunset indefinitely. You would of course need to fly at the speed of rotation *at your latitude* which is different at various latitudes.

You wouldn’t stay at the same time of day though because we standardized on time zones. In an ideal sense you would keep inside the same hour but while you are within a given time zone then officially that hour is passing normally, so for example you would go from 1:00AM to 1:59 AM then cross into the next time zone just in time for 1:00AM to start in that zone, etc. But of course the world isn’t ideal and the time zones aren’t perfectly regular as people shift them around for their convenience, so a cluster of islands doesn’t have a time zone running straight through them for example. This means you would actually tend to jump forward or backwards an hour periodically.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes and no. You could keep the sun in the same relative position in the sky, so for example you could keep it high noon or at sunset indefinitely. You would of course need to fly at the speed of rotation *at your latitude* which is different at various latitudes.

You wouldn’t stay at the same time of day though because we standardized on time zones. In an ideal sense you would keep inside the same hour but while you are within a given time zone then officially that hour is passing normally, so for example you would go from 1:00AM to 1:59 AM then cross into the next time zone just in time for 1:00AM to start in that zone, etc. But of course the world isn’t ideal and the time zones aren’t perfectly regular as people shift them around for their convenience, so a cluster of islands doesn’t have a time zone running straight through them for example. This means you would actually tend to jump forward or backwards an hour periodically.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes. I’ve actually done this on a west-flying jet; it stayed just before sunset for 8 hours as we chased the sun. Another time the my plane had really good tailwinds on one leg of the journey and we got to celebrate new year’s twice during the flight.

Chasing the sun, it would be the same time until you hit the international date line, at which point it would suddenly be the next day at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you flew fast enough (or at high enough latitudes) you could always be at the same time. Always be noon for example.

However every time you passed the international date line you would advance a day on your calendar.

You could spend an entire day with the sun directly overhead, be always noon and then end up going from noon of one day to noon of the next as you cross the date line.