: Since ethernet is so fast and has so much range, why isn’t it used everywhere ?

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Edit : For wired connections such as videos, or anything that needs a high bandwidth

In: Technology
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Because people don’t want to run around with cables in their cellphones and laptops while they’re in public, it would be a mess.

Ethernet has pretty good bandwidth and pretty good speed which is fine for networking but not helpful for many other tasks.

Cat6 cable supports 10 Gigabit Ethernet over a distance of 100 meters which seems pretty good until you start comparing it to other standards.

HDMI 2.1 will handle 48 Gbps over a much shorter distance, and Display Port 1.4 can do 26 Gbps. These bandwidths are needed for displays as 4k 60 Hz video is a minimum of 12 Gbps and could be higher with HDR.

Coax cable was good for cable tv back in the day because while it has less bandwidth than we’ve squeaked out of ethernet today, it could run for hundreds of meters without a signal booster which was great for running it down streets on telephone poles

It is used everywhere. For Ethernet though, cat5, has about 100m length. Most 802.11 standards support more than enough bandwidth and most of the time the bottle neck isn’t if it’s a wired or wireless connection…

Ethernet plugs are a poor design for anything that needs to be plugged and unplugged regularly such as monitors and docking stations used by laptops (hell I’ve destroyed a bunch using them for internet for my laptop), the cables themselves are a poor design for anything that needs to be carefully timed such as audio and video, and using identical wiring for every function is just a *bad* design from a UX standpoint.

It’s used everywhere in corporate setting when possible. All cubicles and devices like printers and such are hardwired. The places were wireless is used is where fixed wire isn’t feasible. Like a inventory scanning device for warehouse. Or a operations management that need to be moving.

That’s point of wireless. To provide connectivity when you’re not fixed at a location