why are people so against automation in factories if it makes things safer and produces more goods? is it just that people are losing jobs? but there are different jobs that open up.

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why are people so against automation in factories if it makes things safer and produces more goods? is it just that people are losing jobs? but there are different jobs that open up.

In: Technology

The problem is we are running out of jobs that someone can do with an average to below average iq that can support a family. Then drug dealing and other crimes start to become a lot more appealing. If enough people find themselves in that position then they might just flip the table so everyone falls on the floor.

Not an unsolvable problem but nobody has any faith in the people in charge to tackle it.

Often there are different jobs, but not the same amount.

Picture a factory with 10 workers. They replaces those 10 people with a machine. The new jobs that will open up will be machine maintenance, which is 1, maybe 2 roles?

Potentially the machine does so well that it’s started to increase the workload. So now the company might need an extra person when the goods come in and one when the goods go out.

So you created 4 roles, which still leaves 6 people out of work.

No, there are not.

A human that is qualified to supervise or maintain one robot will always be in charge of many robots.

A robot that is good enough to replace one human will always replace many humans.

Think of it like a triangle: the base of the triangle is much wider. The base of our triangle are low level (in qualification) workers, and they are the majority of us, and they are the ones getting replaced by robots.

Even if automation creates new jobs in the middle of the triangle, it will never be close to the same number.

In my opinion a better solution is to move away from the notion of needing a job to live, because automation means we can be productive without working.

Well automations been a problem for sometime, like even the automation of car manufacturing was a problem.

It eliminates the need for the blue collar workers, the working class, the % of the population that have nothing more than a high school certificate (if that) and I think you’ll find that’s quite a large % of the population.

This has been happening since humans started creating tools.

The problem for the people complaining is that, yes, jobs will open somewhere else, but that doesn’t mean that the same people doing the old job can transition to the new one.

Think professional drivers. They’re a huge part of the workforce and they’re due for extinction. Yes, in that time most likely more tech jobs will open, but it’s kinda difficult for a truck driver to become a developer.

In the long run society overall benefits from productivity improvements (we no longer have 60% of people working in the fields, for example), but the people caught in the transition don’t.