Why are there different blood group systems like ABO or MN?

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Why are there different blood group systems like ABO or MN?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

they’re classifications for different groups of proteins called antigens that can be found on the surface of blood cells, typically controlled by the same gene or closely linked genes. people generally only have certain antigens within a given blood group, and view any other antigen within that group as a foreign substance and produce antibodies for it. for example, a person with type A blood means that they have A antigens and produce antibodies that attack B antigens. however, these antibodies don’t affect other types of antigens like Rh or MN antigens; they have their own antibodies.

when doing transfusions, it’s best if you can match as many antigens as possible between the donor and the recipient. obviously this isn’t completely feasible most of the time, as there are currently [33 blood groups with over 300 known antigens](https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260296/#sec1-2title), so ABO and Rh groups have been identified as the most important for the general public to know because they cause the most severe issues if there is a mismatch.

Anonymous 0 Comments

they’re classifications for different groups of proteins called antigens that can be found on the surface of blood cells, typically controlled by the same gene or closely linked genes. people generally only have certain antigens within a given blood group, and view any other antigen within that group as a foreign substance and produce antibodies for it. for example, a person with type A blood means that they have A antigens and produce antibodies that attack B antigens. however, these antibodies don’t affect other types of antigens like Rh or MN antigens; they have their own antibodies.

when doing transfusions, it’s best if you can match as many antigens as possible between the donor and the recipient. obviously this isn’t completely feasible most of the time, as there are currently [33 blood groups with over 300 known antigens](https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260296/#sec1-2title), so ABO and Rh groups have been identified as the most important for the general public to know because they cause the most severe issues if there is a mismatch.

Anonymous 0 Comments

they’re classifications for different groups of proteins called antigens that can be found on the surface of blood cells, typically controlled by the same gene or closely linked genes. people generally only have certain antigens within a given blood group, and view any other antigen within that group as a foreign substance and produce antibodies for it. for example, a person with type A blood means that they have A antigens and produce antibodies that attack B antigens. however, these antibodies don’t affect other types of antigens like Rh or MN antigens; they have their own antibodies.

when doing transfusions, it’s best if you can match as many antigens as possible between the donor and the recipient. obviously this isn’t completely feasible most of the time, as there are currently [33 blood groups with over 300 known antigens](https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260296/#sec1-2title), so ABO and Rh groups have been identified as the most important for the general public to know because they cause the most severe issues if there is a mismatch.