Why do elemental gases like hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen exist in molecular form by default?

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Why do elemental gases like hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen exist in molecular form by default?

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6 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because their outer electron shells are unfilled. This means they’ll aggressively grab onto anything convenient, and if there’s only other atoms of the same type around, that’s where they’ll go. They then share 1-3 electrons between two atoms and become much more mellow. this is especially true for nitrogen, whose triple bond is the strongest atomic bond there is.

Fun fact: many explosives contain lots of nitrogen, because of the extreme energy and pressure released when this bond forms, and it turns from part of a solid into a gas.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Those gases in atomic form are highly reactive, so you rarely encounter them because it takes very little energy to just make them react with a partner to form a pair.

The reason is the unbalanced outer electron shell. Helium doesn’t do this because it has a full outer shell already, but every non-noblegas wants to find another molecule.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because their outer electron shells are unfilled. This means they’ll aggressively grab onto anything convenient, and if there’s only other atoms of the same type around, that’s where they’ll go. They then share 1-3 electrons between two atoms and become much more mellow. this is especially true for nitrogen, whose triple bond is the strongest atomic bond there is.

Fun fact: many explosives contain lots of nitrogen, because of the extreme energy and pressure released when this bond forms, and it turns from part of a solid into a gas.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Those gases in atomic form are highly reactive, so you rarely encounter them because it takes very little energy to just make them react with a partner to form a pair.

The reason is the unbalanced outer electron shell. Helium doesn’t do this because it has a full outer shell already, but every non-noblegas wants to find another molecule.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because their outer electron shells are unfilled. This means they’ll aggressively grab onto anything convenient, and if there’s only other atoms of the same type around, that’s where they’ll go. They then share 1-3 electrons between two atoms and become much more mellow. this is especially true for nitrogen, whose triple bond is the strongest atomic bond there is.

Fun fact: many explosives contain lots of nitrogen, because of the extreme energy and pressure released when this bond forms, and it turns from part of a solid into a gas.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Those gases in atomic form are highly reactive, so you rarely encounter them because it takes very little energy to just make them react with a partner to form a pair.

The reason is the unbalanced outer electron shell. Helium doesn’t do this because it has a full outer shell already, but every non-noblegas wants to find another molecule.