why do some TVs make even big budget movies look like they’ve been filmed on cheap cameras?

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why do some TVs make even big budget movies look like they’ve been filmed on cheap cameras?

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4 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Frame rate matching. Movies are generally created at 24 frames per second or thereabouts. Modern TVs are usually 60 frames per second or higher. The TV has a function that can translate the 24 frames per second of the film to the frames per second of the TV panel. The quality of this translation varies with different TV models. The film will look best when the TV can switch to a 24 frames per second mode. This will remove the Soap Opera effect that you may be experiencing. Look for any Motion Smoothing options in your TV settings and turn them off.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Frame rate matching. Movies are generally created at 24 frames per second or thereabouts. Modern TVs are usually 60 frames per second or higher. The TV has a function that can translate the 24 frames per second of the film to the frames per second of the TV panel. The quality of this translation varies with different TV models. The film will look best when the TV can switch to a 24 frames per second mode. This will remove the Soap Opera effect that you may be experiencing. Look for any Motion Smoothing options in your TV settings and turn them off.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because it’s “faking” a high frame rate. Movies are shot at 27(? Might be 23) frames per second, but modern TVs will fill in the frames between to make it 60 frames. It can lead to some weird looking artifacts and motion. TVs have a higher frame rate for sports broadcasts and video games. You can turn this off actually, on Samsung it’s called “clearvision” or something like that. I’m not well-versed enough on current televisions to really elaborate more. But we’re in eli5 so I guess that simple overview might serve this purpose 🤷

This also depends on the cheapness of the screen itself, if the black levels aren’t dark enough or the color is a little off/not saturated enough it can make any cinematic experience extremely subpar.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Because it’s “faking” a high frame rate. Movies are shot at 27(? Might be 23) frames per second, but modern TVs will fill in the frames between to make it 60 frames. It can lead to some weird looking artifacts and motion. TVs have a higher frame rate for sports broadcasts and video games. You can turn this off actually, on Samsung it’s called “clearvision” or something like that. I’m not well-versed enough on current televisions to really elaborate more. But we’re in eli5 so I guess that simple overview might serve this purpose 🤷

This also depends on the cheapness of the screen itself, if the black levels aren’t dark enough or the color is a little off/not saturated enough it can make any cinematic experience extremely subpar.