Why does hearing loss occur during a fight or flight response?

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[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/The_Fight_or_Flight_Response.png](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/The_Fight_or_Flight_Response.png)

At the bottom of the link it shows 9 symptoms

what is the point of losing your hearing during the fight or flight response?

In: Biology
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It’s not so much that you lose the ability to hear. Every one has been in scary situations and jumped at relatively innocuous stimuli – like the door bell ringing when we weren’t expecting it

It’s more, as far as I can make out, that we lose the ability to process complex cognitive loads under stress.

Here’s a paper that explains in more detail.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944410/

Best wishes.

Visual acuity is paramount in a fight or flight situation, which is why our vision is our prize sense from an evolutionary standpoint. In ‘fight’ a type of ‘tunnel vision’ occurs, which cuts out many other sensations as it engages instinct over thought. You lose the ability to choose (for a period) to disengage from the instinct that won out, and muscle memory runs things you normally would choose to through specific thought. You can do a lot of things on muscle memory alone (running, swinging fists’. The brain can only coordinate so many conscious decisions and actions… but it can literally run much of your body without any at all, guided by the ‘software’ that is ‘pre-installed’. I assume flight is exactly the same, with the opposite choice. That was my experience with it the one time it happened, anyway. It was a long time ago, but I could look back on it afterwards (fight was my choice, flight was there’s). We can train ourselves to endure situations that might otherwise send us into that mode, to prevent it from taking over until the situation exceeds the training. That is how people run into burning buildings, how police and military engage a hostile situation (optimally anyway). Either of those situations our programming could prevent us from acting on. That bar is different for each person and people are generally held less accountable for actions conducted under extreme duress accordingly, as we understand it scientifically.