Why is bypassing the PIN on a debit card something you can do? Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of having a PIN to begin with?

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Why is bypassing the PIN on a debit card something you can do? Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of having a PIN to begin with?

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48 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Tap payments have been around for years here in Canada. They usually have a low-ish limit (say $100) so someone who gets your card can’t just charge thousands of dollars in a short time.

The card must be present to be used, and if someone steals it you can cancel it with a quick call. You can’t withdraw cash from an ATM using tap so overall it’s fairly secure.

And way easier. Which means people spend more and the bank makes more $$

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Tap payments have been around for years here in Canada. They usually have a low-ish limit (say $100) so someone who gets your card can’t just charge thousands of dollars in a short time.

The card must be present to be used, and if someone steals it you can cancel it with a quick call. You can’t withdraw cash from an ATM using tap so overall it’s fairly secure.

And way easier. Which means people spend more and the bank makes more $$

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

If you’re bypassing the pin the payment is processed as a credit card transaction not a debit card transaction. Credit card transactions in the US don’t require a PIN and credit cards don’t even have pins in the US.

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Tap payments have been around for years here in Canada. They usually have a low-ish limit (say $100) so someone who gets your card can’t just charge thousands of dollars in a short time.

The card must be present to be used, and if someone steals it you can cancel it with a quick call. You can’t withdraw cash from an ATM using tap so overall it’s fairly secure.

And way easier. Which means people spend more and the bank makes more $$

Anonymous 0 Comments

The bank would still know whether or not a PIN was entered, and this information might be useful in a fraud claim case.

It isn’t concrete, but if they used a PIN then this implies they either somehow stole it from you, you use the same PIN for everything (hello address people), or you are lying to them and trying to commit fraud.

Anonymous 0 Comments

You always have a conflict between security and convinence. The more secure the more inconvinent solutions tend to be. Since the bypass is only for low amount payments and disabling a card is done in a whim this is allowed to increase convinence absolutly at cost of security. But the cost is deemed small because of the mentioned reasons.