: 30 and 60 FPS

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Then why 60 FPS looks much smoother?
Wouldn’t it make a difference between 30 FPS and 60 FPS if we were able to see up to 30 FPS?
Why 60 and an example 90 or 120 FPS don’t make difference when an example you’re playing games?

In: Technology

> if we were able to see up to 30 FPS

This is wrong.

First eyes do not see in frames.

Second, a higher framerate means a better responsivity, no matter if you can see all the frames or not.

> Why 60 and an example 90 or 120 FPS don’t make difference when an example you’re playing games?

In some cases it really does, but most screens are only able to display 60, so unless you are really sensible to this kind of stuff, or have a higher refresh-rate display the difference is really minimal.

>Then why 60 FPS looks much smoother?

Why does 30 FPS look much smoother than 15fps? It’s less choppy.

>Wouldn’t it make a difference between 30 FPS and 60 FPS if we were able to see up to 30 FPS?

We do not only see up to 30 FPS. That is wrong.

>Why 60 and an example 90 or 120 FPS don’t make difference when an example you’re playing games?

It does make a difference. Depending on what type of person you are, it might not be a very big difference. Also the difference between 30fps and 60fps is less than the difference between 60fps and 120fps in terms of how it feels.

Each piece of video is a still image, and the more still images you can display in a second, the the lower the chance your brain has to be able to register that fact (persistence of vision). Thus the moving image will look more fluid and natural at higher frame rates. Which is very useful in certain games, especially competitive fighters and shooters.

The idea that the human eye can only perceive 30fps is a bit of a long running joke in the PC gaming community. IIRC, most humans with good vision can see a noticeable difference up to around 180-200fps. Some individuals can perceive even higher rates.

The reason consoles tend to run at 30fps though is due to limitations with the hardware. Consoles have to be cheap. They also have to fit everything into relatively a small enclosure, so they can’t run too hot. So compromises have to be made. So you can either have higher graphical detail, higher resolution, or high frame rates, but not all three. Most companies will optimize most games in that order. 30fps is a “good enough” mark. Smooth enough that it doesn’t look choppy, but slow enough to run highly detailed games on modest hardware at a consistent speed. But if you put the two side by side, games at 60fps do look better.

The reason 30 and 60fps are used as the baselines is because when the NTSC standard was set, frame rate for TVs was synced to the frequency of the electrical grid. Which is 60 cycles per second alternating current in North America. This was mainly to minimize electrical noise in early vacuum tube driven analogue sets. Modern sets run on direct current with isolated power supplies, so they don’t care as much, but the standard has stuck around to maintain compatibility with older programming.