Can the light outside the human visible spectrum damage our eyes?

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We’re often warned about how dangerous small commercial lasers can be for our eyes yet technologies like FaceID projects light in our faces many times a day.

Why is FaceID safe? Because it’s low enough power or because it’s in the non-visible spectrum?

Can the non-visible spectrum be dangerous for our eyes?

In: 40

Yes. UV light is quite harmful, x rays and gamma rays too. Infra red I’m not too sure about

Short answer, yes in sufficient doses. Just about everything at a higher frequency can damage the human eye and the only reason we don’t suffer from it is because we take it in such low amounts.

For example, the single flash you get from a medical x-ray is harmless but if the doctor pounded on the button as fast as he could for a day you’d suffer a dangerous dose of radiation. Same with UV rays. A little is good for your health but too much will cause sunburns . Just imagine sunburns on the insides of your eyes.

There are two types of light outside the visible spectrum. Infrared and Ultraviolet. And those are completely different things. Things like FaceID and night vision cameras and the like use infrared. This is basically harmless to us, at least compared to visible light. It is technically possible to get too high concentration of IR light just as visible light and this may burn you. Especially the eyes as you do not have the same reflexes for IR light as for visible light. This is why powerful IR lasers have the same warning stickers as visible light lasers. However consumer products do not contain these types of powerful lasers, and if they do they are not exposed to the user.

Ultraviolet does have the same issues as IR and visible light when it comes to the powerful concentrated lasers that can burn you. But in addition to this UV light is at the lower end of ionizing radiation. This is the type of radiation which can damage tissue and cause things like radiation burns and cancer. This can happen at much lower intensities. So even non-lasar UV lights will come with warnings and shields preventing people from being exposed to it.

All waves of light are damaging in the right dosage. If I put your eyeballs in a microwave, they’ll be damaged. If I put them in front of an x-ray machine for long enough, they’ll be damaged. Or in front of a laser at any number of visible or invisible wavelengths.

Anything that the biological material of the eye can absorb will interact with that material. You get enough interactions per time frame and you’ll start doing damage. The eye is alive though and can cool itself with evaporation and blood flow so as long as the dosage stays below a threshold no permanent damage is done.

Yes. Anything from near infrared on up can damage the eye. The eye is fairly opaque to certain wavelengths (like some in the UV portion of the spectrum), so most of the damage is on the outer part of the eye, as opposed to near IR and visible light where the damage focuses on the retina.

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We’re often warned about how dangerous small commercial lasers can be for our eyes yet technologies like FaceID projects light in our faces many times a day.

Why is FaceID safe? Because it’s low enough power or because it’s in the non-visible spectrum?

Can the non-visible spectrum be dangerous for our eyes?

In: 40

Yes. UV light is quite harmful, x rays and gamma rays too. Infra red I’m not too sure about

Short answer, yes in sufficient doses. Just about everything at a higher frequency can damage the human eye and the only reason we don’t suffer from it is because we take it in such low amounts.

For example, the single flash you get from a medical x-ray is harmless but if the doctor pounded on the button as fast as he could for a day you’d suffer a dangerous dose of radiation. Same with UV rays. A little is good for your health but too much will cause sunburns . Just imagine sunburns on the insides of your eyes.

There are two types of light outside the visible spectrum. Infrared and Ultraviolet. And those are completely different things. Things like FaceID and night vision cameras and the like use infrared. This is basically harmless to us, at least compared to visible light. It is technically possible to get too high concentration of IR light just as visible light and this may burn you. Especially the eyes as you do not have the same reflexes for IR light as for visible light. This is why powerful IR lasers have the same warning stickers as visible light lasers. However consumer products do not contain these types of powerful lasers, and if they do they are not exposed to the user.

Ultraviolet does have the same issues as IR and visible light when it comes to the powerful concentrated lasers that can burn you. But in addition to this UV light is at the lower end of ionizing radiation. This is the type of radiation which can damage tissue and cause things like radiation burns and cancer. This can happen at much lower intensities. So even non-lasar UV lights will come with warnings and shields preventing people from being exposed to it.

All waves of light are damaging in the right dosage. If I put your eyeballs in a microwave, they’ll be damaged. If I put them in front of an x-ray machine for long enough, they’ll be damaged. Or in front of a laser at any number of visible or invisible wavelengths.

Anything that the biological material of the eye can absorb will interact with that material. You get enough interactions per time frame and you’ll start doing damage. The eye is alive though and can cool itself with evaporation and blood flow so as long as the dosage stays below a threshold no permanent damage is done.

Yes. Anything from near infrared on up can damage the eye. The eye is fairly opaque to certain wavelengths (like some in the UV portion of the spectrum), so most of the damage is on the outer part of the eye, as opposed to near IR and visible light where the damage focuses on the retina.