Generations

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Please explain to me like I’m 5
Why is the inconsistency in the age ranges of generations?
Lost Generation: 1883 – 1900 (17 Years)
The Greatest Generation: 1901 – 1927 (26 Years)
The Silent Generation: 1928 – 1945 (17 Years)
Baby Boomers: 1946 – 1964 (18 Years)
Generation X: 1965 – 1980 (15 Years)
Generation Y/Millennials: 1981 – 1996 (15 Years)
Generation Z: 1997 – 2012 (15 Years)
Gen Alpha: 2013 – Present (Currently 9 Years)

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It is based on cultural events more than time. What happened that had significant impact on ones worldview from 0 to say 20.

>Please explain to me like I’m 5
>Why is the inconsistency in the age ranges of generations?
>Lost Generation: 1883 – 1900 (17 Years)
>The Greatest Generation: 1901 – 1927 (26 Years)
>The Silent Generation: 1928 – 1945 (17 Years)
>Baby Boomers: 1946 – 1964 (18 Years)
>Generation X: 1965 – 1980 (15 Years)
>Generation Y/Millennials: 1981 – 1996 (15 Years)
>Generation Z: 1997 – 2012 (15 Years)
>Gen Alpha: 2013 – Present (Currently 9 Years)

“Generations” in that sense are not an accurate metric for measuring anything. They are a handy **narrative** tool to tell simplified stories about complex recent historical developments. That inevitably means information are lost or distorted, but it makes for a better story.

Generations are usually pretty arbitrary in definition. People pretty much made them up on the fly. Most of them are more so vague concepts than clearly defined age groups. Even with Gen X and beyond, you get subdivisions such as Zilennials, aka people who are born in the early years of Gen Z, but to are too old to identify fully with Gen Z, because they grew up right in that gap where the technology that is commonly associated with Gen Z just wasn’t quite there yet, but they were also too young to be Milennials.

Cassettes went out of fashion, but smartphones weren’t a thing yet (letalone something the average citizen could afford), and internet wasn’t fast enough for streaming anyway, so instead, you had the discman, which was a walkman, but for CDs. They came too late for the golden days of the 90s, but are too young to grow up with lives centered around social media and the like, but they got the DS and Phineas and Ferb instead.

Life-defining historical events. The great depression and WWII. Soldiers came home and had a family, causing a baby boom. That tapered off, but the wave of children from the end of WWII to that tapering off was about 18 years. After that they had kids in a second wave. The wave really became less noticeable after that, but people kinda generally decided that a “generation” is 15 years.

Personally, there’s a big split between me and anyone even a little younger that didn’t get their foot in the door before the econopocalypse.

The plague screwing over all the kids for 2 years of education is likely going to be a defining moment. All in favor of renaming Gen-Z to “plague rats”?

Generations like these are not actually hard strictly defined things. There a[re conflicting answers that go against the data set you listed](https://www.goldmansachs.com/insights/archive/millennials/) so it is not a hard clearly defined edge.
They tend to have events involved, like culture shifts or conflicts. Using the Gen-Z data an example would be “Were they old enough to remember 9/11 or pre-9/11 life?”
Boomers “Were they a byproduct of the Silent Generation who experienced growth from post-war booms?”

0 views
0

Please explain to me like I’m 5
Why is the inconsistency in the age ranges of generations?
Lost Generation: 1883 – 1900 (17 Years)
The Greatest Generation: 1901 – 1927 (26 Years)
The Silent Generation: 1928 – 1945 (17 Years)
Baby Boomers: 1946 – 1964 (18 Years)
Generation X: 1965 – 1980 (15 Years)
Generation Y/Millennials: 1981 – 1996 (15 Years)
Generation Z: 1997 – 2012 (15 Years)
Gen Alpha: 2013 – Present (Currently 9 Years)

In: 0

It is based on cultural events more than time. What happened that had significant impact on ones worldview from 0 to say 20.

>Please explain to me like I’m 5
>Why is the inconsistency in the age ranges of generations?
>Lost Generation: 1883 – 1900 (17 Years)
>The Greatest Generation: 1901 – 1927 (26 Years)
>The Silent Generation: 1928 – 1945 (17 Years)
>Baby Boomers: 1946 – 1964 (18 Years)
>Generation X: 1965 – 1980 (15 Years)
>Generation Y/Millennials: 1981 – 1996 (15 Years)
>Generation Z: 1997 – 2012 (15 Years)
>Gen Alpha: 2013 – Present (Currently 9 Years)

“Generations” in that sense are not an accurate metric for measuring anything. They are a handy **narrative** tool to tell simplified stories about complex recent historical developments. That inevitably means information are lost or distorted, but it makes for a better story.

Generations are usually pretty arbitrary in definition. People pretty much made them up on the fly. Most of them are more so vague concepts than clearly defined age groups. Even with Gen X and beyond, you get subdivisions such as Zilennials, aka people who are born in the early years of Gen Z, but to are too old to identify fully with Gen Z, because they grew up right in that gap where the technology that is commonly associated with Gen Z just wasn’t quite there yet, but they were also too young to be Milennials.

Cassettes went out of fashion, but smartphones weren’t a thing yet (letalone something the average citizen could afford), and internet wasn’t fast enough for streaming anyway, so instead, you had the discman, which was a walkman, but for CDs. They came too late for the golden days of the 90s, but are too young to grow up with lives centered around social media and the like, but they got the DS and Phineas and Ferb instead.

Life-defining historical events. The great depression and WWII. Soldiers came home and had a family, causing a baby boom. That tapered off, but the wave of children from the end of WWII to that tapering off was about 18 years. After that they had kids in a second wave. The wave really became less noticeable after that, but people kinda generally decided that a “generation” is 15 years.

Personally, there’s a big split between me and anyone even a little younger that didn’t get their foot in the door before the econopocalypse.

The plague screwing over all the kids for 2 years of education is likely going to be a defining moment. All in favor of renaming Gen-Z to “plague rats”?

Generations like these are not actually hard strictly defined things. There a[re conflicting answers that go against the data set you listed](https://www.goldmansachs.com/insights/archive/millennials/) so it is not a hard clearly defined edge.
They tend to have events involved, like culture shifts or conflicts. Using the Gen-Z data an example would be “Were they old enough to remember 9/11 or pre-9/11 life?”
Boomers “Were they a byproduct of the Silent Generation who experienced growth from post-war booms?”