How can a machine extrude a round pasta shape with a hole in the middle (e.g penne), without the middle metal part blocking the hole falling away

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How can a round shape be made, when the middle part of the metal creating the hole needs to be attached to something, which would create a gap in the shape

In: 479

Simply support the thing in the center from behind the aperture through which the substance is forced.

Imagine a plate with a hole in it as your extrusion aperture. Behind it is a cavity that holds the substance being extruded, and a rod extends from the far wall into the extrusion hole.

The dough of the pasta is slightly malleable/moldable, so the central “hole” can be made by a rod held at the rear of the extruder. The dough will be pushed around the rod before being pushed outward through the extruder die; the compression around the rod will help seal the dough back up to form a continuous piece.

In [this example](https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0345/3514/5604/products/marcato-regina-pasta-extruder-machine-lifestyle-borough-kitchen_900x.jpg?v=1609766198), you can see that the face of the die has a central plastic bit, with a small gap around it.

If you split pasta dough you can join it back by forcing it together under pressure. This is what the pasta extruders does. Pasta dough is forced under very high pressure through a metal die. The die does have support structures supporting the center core and the dough have to go around these structures. However due to the high pressure the pasta dough will join back together on the other side. You usually do not even see the join in the finished product.

The same technique is not invented for pasta though. Extrusions are heavily used in lots of industrial applications to make things like plastic and metal components. And a lot of these do have similar cores as pasta shapes. For example pipes.

And a follow up question, does it work the same way for extruded aluminum tubes ?

[Here’s a photo of the front and back of a paster maker](https://i.imgur.com/ijZzCvx.jpg). If you imagine drilling a cylindrical hole from the front and those 6 holes from the back so they meet in the middle, then everything is physically connected together and the pasta being squeezed into the cylindrical hole makes it reform into a complete tube.

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0

How can a round shape be made, when the middle part of the metal creating the hole needs to be attached to something, which would create a gap in the shape

In: 479

Simply support the thing in the center from behind the aperture through which the substance is forced.

Imagine a plate with a hole in it as your extrusion aperture. Behind it is a cavity that holds the substance being extruded, and a rod extends from the far wall into the extrusion hole.

The dough of the pasta is slightly malleable/moldable, so the central “hole” can be made by a rod held at the rear of the extruder. The dough will be pushed around the rod before being pushed outward through the extruder die; the compression around the rod will help seal the dough back up to form a continuous piece.

In [this example](https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0345/3514/5604/products/marcato-regina-pasta-extruder-machine-lifestyle-borough-kitchen_900x.jpg?v=1609766198), you can see that the face of the die has a central plastic bit, with a small gap around it.

If you split pasta dough you can join it back by forcing it together under pressure. This is what the pasta extruders does. Pasta dough is forced under very high pressure through a metal die. The die does have support structures supporting the center core and the dough have to go around these structures. However due to the high pressure the pasta dough will join back together on the other side. You usually do not even see the join in the finished product.

The same technique is not invented for pasta though. Extrusions are heavily used in lots of industrial applications to make things like plastic and metal components. And a lot of these do have similar cores as pasta shapes. For example pipes.

And a follow up question, does it work the same way for extruded aluminum tubes ?

[Here’s a photo of the front and back of a paster maker](https://i.imgur.com/ijZzCvx.jpg). If you imagine drilling a cylindrical hole from the front and those 6 holes from the back so they meet in the middle, then everything is physically connected together and the pasta being squeezed into the cylindrical hole makes it reform into a complete tube.