how come announcers and speakers sound so differently when recorded in the 1950, 60s ads/recordings? Is this because they were recorded differently and it just sounds like that or was it because they talked like that?

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how come announcers and speakers sound so differently when recorded in the 1950, 60s ads/recordings? Is this because they were recorded differently and it just sounds like that or was it because they talked like that?

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The mics and recording quality was different and you had to speak louder to get a decent amplitude to record. Furthermore every time era has there different slang and rythm to speak. And at the end the quality often gets worse during the time it is stored or reused in clips from clips and not the original source. Combine that.

a combination. they also affect each other in the way that the deep voiceover thats usually used in ads nowadays would sound terrible back then, so they had to kinda make those pitch jumps.

It was an accent that they trained to speak in IIRC. I think is was called transcontinental or something akin to that. I’m not sure when it phased out for What we are used to today.

Part of it is affecting a transatlantic accent as other shave said. The rest is the recording equipment. Speakers and recording media (tape/vinyl) could not reproduce the full range of frequencies we can hear as widely and accurately as modern equipment. Go back to the 40s or earlier and this is true of the microphones as well. You were working with mostly midrange and didn’t have accurate reproduction of highs and lows.

I think it was partially a cultural thing.

Broadcasters emulate each other, to sound “professional”.