How do scientists explain the creation of the first single cell organism? Did it have parts like the mitochondria we know today?

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How do scientists explain the creation of the first single cell organism? Did it have parts like the mitochondria we know today?

In: Biology

A common theory is underwater volcanous activity around porous stones. (Called white smokers, googling them will propably point you directly to articles about origin of life)

The hot water contained many chemical components needed to form life and randomly mixed in small pores in the stone, and got pushed out sometimes. Randomly one had a fattie outer layer to protect it from the open water and the means to reproduce on it’s own.

I personally have no clue how this first organism was structured, but theres propably theories for that as well

Firstly, mitochondria only exist in eukaryotic cells, which make up multi-cellular organisms. Most single-celled organisms (prokaryotes) do not have mitochondria.

Prokaryotes are very simplistic in comparison to eukaryotes. They have no nucleus, and no cell membrane. The current theory is that pre-biotic molecules evolved, through natural selection, to become self-replicating. From there, the first single-celled organisms evolved. However, the exact origins are still poorly understood.

Interesting sidenote – mitochondria were once single celled organisms. They formed a symbiotic relationship with other single-celled organisms, to form eukaryotic cells.

*edit* for the avoidance of confusion – there *are* single celled organisms that are also eukaryotic, like protozoa. They’re the exception rather than the rule.