How does a transformer work?

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Edit:
I meant this [one](https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transformer)

In: Technology

Ohh, no answers yet. I actually looked into this recently!

Okay, so electricity is generated by something spinning around a magnet or vice-versa(to oversimplify, usually…)

The electricity generated at one end by the spinning, makes something spin at the other end(another magnet is involved).

Now, what happens in a transformer is just like a car’s transmission. Think of the voltage like the crankshaft.

Basically, the voltage hitting the transformer spins the magnet, but it spins a bunch of different sized magnets that add up to the same amount of energy, so the voltage splits off into multiple directions.

Like, you send a thousand volts to a transformer, the power spins a wheel in the transformer, which causes other wheels to spin at different speeds, dividing up the energy so the places the energy needs to go get the right amount.

It’s really brilliant, and I wish I had researched it years ago.

When you move a wire though an electromagnetic field you can induce a current in the wire… The same works the other way where if you “move” the electric or magnetic field relative to the wire it can induce a current in the wire. As well, a current going through a wire will create its own electric and magnetic fields.

Using alternating current (where the direction of the current will flip proportional to its frequency… So if its 60hz then it will change direction 120 times per second) you can create a changing electromagnetic field, if you have 2 wires close together you can induce an alternating current in the other wire. To better induce such a current you add coils.

Edit: wrote this really early in the morning local time

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When you make a coil out of electric wire and run alternating current through it, the changes in the current will produce a magnetic field (also alternating) around that coil, particularly in the center of it. That’s the basic principle of electromagnetism.

If there’s an alternating magnetic flow passing through the center of an electric coil, it will induce an electric current in the coil.

In the most basic transformer, you have two coils with different number of winding turns (the number of times the wire is looped) around a magnetic conductor. When you connect one of the coils to voltage, the magnetic conductor carries the magnetic flux induced in it by the first coil through the second one. Since the coils have a different number of turns, the voltage in the second coil will be different than in the first. This way you can transform super high voltage from the power lines into 220V you use at home.