I keep hearing that Australia’s population is so low due to uninhibitle land. Yet they have a very generous immigration attitude and there’s no child limit that I’m aware of. How can/does geography make any difference?

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I keep hearing that Australia’s population is so low due to uninhibitle land. Yet they have a very generous immigration attitude and there’s no child limit that I’m aware of. How can/does geography make any difference?

In: 1468

Much of the middle of the country is desert.

It’s very very dry and very very hot.

Some huge percentage of our population live on the eastern seaboard in major metropolitan cities.

There is into so many people we can jam into those cities.

We do have rural cities but population in them is,.comparatively, low.

Take a look at Coober pedy. It’s so hot there that they live underground.

Population is generally expressed as ‘so many thousands of people per unit of area’. When you live on a huge landmass, the centre of which is basically boiling desert and full of things that would kill you if you tried to live there, the sums will come out with a very small number even if your inhabited places are quite full.

If you have a desired skillset, it’s easy to immigrate. If you are an asylum seeker, not so much

Side note: It would be very hard to build cities like Sydey and Melbourne in the desert. But it’s not uninhabited!

Aboriginal people have lived across Australia for 60,000 years — [including the desert](https://theconversation.com/aboriginal-people-lived-in-australias-desert-interior-50-000-years-ago-earlier-than-first-thought-102111). They are able to do this through intense study of geography, climate, ecology, plants, and animals. This knowledge is part of the Aboriginal connection to land.

Natural population growth is somewhat limited since it takes time for babies to grow up and have kids of their own. Biologically (and societally) it was not uncommon for the average woman to have more than 6-7 children but that sort of appears to be the upper limit (it takes 9 months gestation and takes a toll on the human body etc). Even at those rates of fertility, infant mortality and poor healthcare means that populations rise at about 3-6% annually.

Today, there is no country that grows faster than 5% annually.

Consider also that nearly all the modern stuff we are used to were not widely available 100 years ago – especially things like medicine, modern fertilizers, wide spread electrification, easy transportation etc. These are all constraints on population growth since people die more often, food cannot be made available in remote locations etc etc.

Australia started with a low population, does not have lots of land (relative to the size) good for agriculture, has inhospitable climate and environment without technology.