If the moon has a big heavy mass that is not in the center, why is it on the far side of the moon and not the side closest to us?

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If the moon has a big heavy mass that is not in the center, why is it on the far side of the moon and not the side closest to us?

In: Physics

Due to the centripetal force of the moons orbit. If you stick a marble inside a balloon, blow it up, and tie a string around it then swing the balloon in a circle over your head what will the marble do?

You know how, when you hang a bucket of water by a rope and spin it around really fast, the water presses to the bottom of the bucket, the side farthest from the center of the spin? It’s like that, except with big rocks held together by gravity.

From the report it’s 4.8 quintillion pounds, which is actually only about .3% of the total mass of the moon. In my view that’s just not large enough compared to the object as a whole to influence it’s own position relative to the earth

These centripetal force replies are not addressing the Earth’s gravity well at all. The moon isn’t spinning around us on a string and if you’re going to play at that you have to explain why the heavy side wouldn’t be more attracted to Earth.

Is this something in the surface or are we just talking off-center center of mass by a bit?