Is there any connection between heat and likelihood / severity of sunburn? E.g. it is 25 degrees centrigrade in one country and 45 in another. Assuming their is no cloud cover in either and other variables are the same, would you be more likely to get burnt in the hotter country or as likely?

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Is there any connection between heat and likelihood / severity of sunburn? E.g. it is 25 degrees centrigrade in one country and 45 in another. Assuming their is no cloud cover in either and other variables are the same, would you be more likely to get burnt in the hotter country or as likely?

In: Biology

It’s not so much heat but UV light. In warmer climates. UV index is high. The sun is just above in the middle of the sky. High temps, can cause more of a heat stroke.

It depends on the UV index, ultimately, which depends on a lot of factors, such as:

* Air quality (dust can block UV light)
* Altitude (Air itself blocks UV and the less air/higher altitude, the less protection)
* Reflective index of the ground (lighter ground reflects more UV, giving it 2x the chances to burn you)
* Lattitude of the location & how direct the sunlight is.

Keeping all other things the same, the hotter country you’d be likely to burn faster for two reasons: one, you’re more likely to have more skin showing in hotter weather, and two, hotter air will be thinner and therefore less protecting than colder air.

Sunburn is caused by UV, not heat. If you’re more likely to be exposed to sunlight when it’s hot out, then yes, you’re more more likely to get a sunburn.

Doesn’t mean you won’t get sunburn in cold weather. A lot of people get sunburned while skiing, snowboarding, etc.

Places near the equator do get more sunlight on average per unit area, which increases both UV exposure and temperature.

So there’s correlation, but not causation.