Mass explanation: I’ve always been told that mass was not the same as weight, and that grams are the metric unit of mass. But grams are a measurement of weight, so am I stupid, was it was explained to me wrong, or is science just not make sense?

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Mass explanation: I’ve always been told that mass was not the same as weight, and that grams are the metric unit of mass. But grams are a measurement of weight, so am I stupid, was it was explained to me wrong, or is science just not make sense?

In: 140

The difference is gravity. Weight is dependent on gravity while mass isn’t. So if you had a 5 kg object and you brought it to space, the weight would be 0 but the mass would be the same.

Grams are a measure of mass, not weight. If you’re being pedantic, newtons would be the measure of weight in the metric system, but since the vast majority of us only have to deal with Earth’s gravity, we use mass and weight interchangeably.

1kg of mass weighs 1kg at sea level on earth.

That same 1kg of mass weighs less on the moon and weighs more on Jupiter.

The weight is the pull of gravity

Mass is how much ‘stuff’ you have in a thing. Weight is how heavy it feels in gravity.

That’s why you would weight differently on different planets.

So your mass isn’t changing, you’re still made of the same stuff…. but your weight changes because bigger planets will pull on you harder than smaller planets…. so you weight more on large planets than you do on smaller planets, but you have the same mass.

Grams measure mass and your weight on Earth. If you went to the moon you would have the same mass but weigh less because there’s less gravity.

Grams is strictly not a measurement of weight. The correct unit to use is Newton. But we can make an assumption of standard gravity which means that we can measure the mass of something directly by measuring its weight. So we do often use grams for weight as a shorthand.