why do people in floods have to be rescued?

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It may seem like a dumb question but I really am curious. from what I’ve seen in the media, it’s only like 1 or 2 feet of flood water. I don’t understand why they can’t go in the water because I don’t understand why the water is dangerous in the first place.

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One or two feet of fast moving water will rip you off your feet, flash you down stream, and hit all the rocks, debris, and trees in the way. Then you get to drown and be filled with mud for your last breath.

Flooding can be very dangerous, as there’s no way for emergency vehicles to get anywhere, power is out, phone lines are out, there’s no climate control, food, clean water, plumbing, etc.

The water movement issue is just for trying to go from A to B. The rest of it just takes you back thousands of years to pre-civilization times.

It’s basically sewage and it’s full of sharp or otherwise hazardous materials. You don’t know how firm the ground is and can easy become stuck or fall in.

The water during a flood isn’t like 1-2 feet of water just sitting in a pool. That would indeed be moderately safe.

What it is is 1-2 feet of water that is flowing and flowing fast. Fast enough that basically nobody can stay on their feet. And it’s not just water it’s full of a bunch of deadly debris. So you can get swept off your feet and then smacked in the head by a brick.

6″ of fast flowing water is enough to move a car downstream. Moving water can exert a ton of force on a person or vehicle trying to pass through it. If you get swept off your feet, the water will carry you downstream fast, and you’ll hit a ton of debris in the process.

Just 6 inches of water can knock a person off their feet, 12 inches can carry off a small car, and 2 feet can carry off a large car or truck.

Currents in flood waters are very strong, but a lot of people don’t understand this and think it’s the same thing as the water in a still lake or swimming pool. Which it is not; it’s more like getting caught in a rip current at the beach.