Why is vomiting a reaction to horrifying sights?

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Why is vomiting a reaction to horrifying sights?

In: 16

It’s a fight-or-flight response. You disgust whatever horrified you in the hopes that it leaves you alone while also making you lighter by emptying your stomache so you can run faster.

Vagal nerve overstimulation, same as getting punched in the gut, kneed in the crotch, getting dizzy or having a high fever can do. Basically a one-size-fits-all “bad things happening” response from the part of your nervous system that normally handles unconscious or semiconscious processes like breathing, digesting, etc.

Also why defecation is a barometer of extreme fright.

It is part of the bodies flight or fight response.

When we see something bad, we prepare for it – we get a surge of adrenaline that prepares us to either run away as fast as possible and escape (flight) or to stand our ground (fight).

Part of this response includes elements like vomiting – emptying the body so that the contents of your stomach won’t cause any issues during the action part (such as being sick during strenuous activity and risking choking or other issues).

Not all of this tracks over perfectly logically when the flight or fight response is triggered by something disgusting rather than scary, but the same impulses still end up triggered due to the similar responses we make.

The other responses are excellent but just to add: when you’ve eaten, your body now spends resources on digestion. Since you’re in serious danger, resources must be reclaimed and to do that, you need to stop digestion and a good way to do that right away is to empty the stomach by throwing up.

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Why is vomiting a reaction to horrifying sights?

In: 16

It’s a fight-or-flight response. You disgust whatever horrified you in the hopes that it leaves you alone while also making you lighter by emptying your stomache so you can run faster.

Vagal nerve overstimulation, same as getting punched in the gut, kneed in the crotch, getting dizzy or having a high fever can do. Basically a one-size-fits-all “bad things happening” response from the part of your nervous system that normally handles unconscious or semiconscious processes like breathing, digesting, etc.

Also why defecation is a barometer of extreme fright.

It is part of the bodies flight or fight response.

When we see something bad, we prepare for it – we get a surge of adrenaline that prepares us to either run away as fast as possible and escape (flight) or to stand our ground (fight).

Part of this response includes elements like vomiting – emptying the body so that the contents of your stomach won’t cause any issues during the action part (such as being sick during strenuous activity and risking choking or other issues).

Not all of this tracks over perfectly logically when the flight or fight response is triggered by something disgusting rather than scary, but the same impulses still end up triggered due to the similar responses we make.

The other responses are excellent but just to add: when you’ve eaten, your body now spends resources on digestion. Since you’re in serious danger, resources must be reclaimed and to do that, you need to stop digestion and a good way to do that right away is to empty the stomach by throwing up.