eli5: Does casting rays through magnifying lens on the solar panels have any positive or negative affect?

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Considering panels can withstand the high levels of heat and energy. Does this have any affect on the time required to charge?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

The panels can collect solar rays that hit it. With a lens that is larger than the panel you could focus light from a larger area onto a smaller panel and increase the input and output.

Anonymous 0 Comments

A magnifying lens would take all of the light going through it and focus it on a smaller area. This would increase the amount of energy hitting a particular solar panel, which could increase its output. However, it would also increase the heat on the panel, which would decrease the efficiency of the solar panels. It would also decrease the lifetime of the panels. Focusing the sun’s rays is used on passive solar arrays, in the form of mirrors instead of lenses. These focus the sun’s rays on a tower or pipes to heat up some kind of fluid or salt that is then used to power a generator

Anonymous 0 Comments

The panels can collect solar rays that hit it. With a lens that is larger than the panel you could focus light from a larger area onto a smaller panel and increase the input and output.

Anonymous 0 Comments

A magnifying lens would take all of the light going through it and focus it on a smaller area. This would increase the amount of energy hitting a particular solar panel, which could increase its output. However, it would also increase the heat on the panel, which would decrease the efficiency of the solar panels. It would also decrease the lifetime of the panels. Focusing the sun’s rays is used on passive solar arrays, in the form of mirrors instead of lenses. These focus the sun’s rays on a tower or pipes to heat up some kind of fluid or salt that is then used to power a generator

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you’re planning to put a magnifying lens the size of the solar panel or smaller in front of it to make the rays stronger, you will only take the same amount of energy and focus it on a smaller area.

If you’re planning to use a magnifying lense that is larger than the panel, you can use it to focus more energy on the panels than it would normally get and this will increase the output.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you’re planning to put a magnifying lens the size of the solar panel or smaller in front of it to make the rays stronger, you will only take the same amount of energy and focus it on a smaller area.

If you’re planning to use a magnifying lense that is larger than the panel, you can use it to focus more energy on the panels than it would normally get and this will increase the output.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Sure, if you use a magnifying lense larger than the panel it will boost production. There are actually solar installations that use this technique to increase production. Though, with the drop in the cost of solar panels, it’s probably no longer economically viable.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Sure, if you use a magnifying lense larger than the panel it will boost production. There are actually solar installations that use this technique to increase production. Though, with the drop in the cost of solar panels, it’s probably no longer economically viable.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you have a solar panel that is 1 square meter and a lens that is 2 square meters, you could focus the light onto the panel and get twice the power.
More or less.
Solar panel efficiency is reduced by heat, so you’ll likely get something like 1.8 of the energy.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As u/jnskjnn said, if you use the magnifier to collect light from an area larger than the solar panel, you can increase its output … IF the unmagnified panel is operating below its capacity.

Solar panels–which include not only the photovoltaic material but the electronics to make the electricity they produce consumable–are designed to optimize electrical output for normal conditions at the Earth’s surface, where solar irradiance maxes out at approximately 1000 to 1100 W/m². If an unmagnified panel is already operating at 100% of its energy production capacity, dumping additional solar energy onto it isn’t going to produce more electricity.