Eli5 Where does electrify go if I unplug phone first from the charger and then charger from the plug?

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I’ve tested it and it had electricity stored and started to change my phone for a second. How long does that electricity stay in, I’d it harmful for a charger or phone? I usually firstly unplug the

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8 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Same place the water goes in a pipe when you shut the tap off.

There’s pressure still pushing against the valve but it’s just not going anywhere because there’s nowhere to go.

Electricity needs a path home (that’s why there’s two prongs) so if there isn’t a path home then the metal that is inside the outlet is as far as the electrons go then they stop. And they just stay there.

Anonymous 0 Comments

That just residual electricity stored in some capacitors on the circuit board of the charger. That is not harmful in any way and will dissipate after a few seconds to a minute or so due to resistance and heat conversion within the charger.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Same place the water goes in a pipe when you shut the tap off.

There’s pressure still pushing against the valve but it’s just not going anywhere because there’s nowhere to go.

Electricity needs a path home (that’s why there’s two prongs) so if there isn’t a path home then the metal that is inside the outlet is as far as the electrons go then they stop. And they just stay there.

Anonymous 0 Comments

That just residual electricity stored in some capacitors on the circuit board of the charger. That is not harmful in any way and will dissipate after a few seconds to a minute or so due to resistance and heat conversion within the charger.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s not harmful. Part of virtually all electrical equipment is a component called capacitor. It has many applications but the easiest to explain is that it acts as a mini-battery to help stabilise the voltage input. What you saw was a capacitor being drained. You will see the same effect on things like tvs where the standby light remains on for a second after you unplug them.

It can definitely be harmful if you disassemble an electrical equipment and touch a capacitor though.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It’s not harmful. Part of virtually all electrical equipment is a component called capacitor. It has many applications but the easiest to explain is that it acts as a mini-battery to help stabilise the voltage input. What you saw was a capacitor being drained. You will see the same effect on things like tvs where the standby light remains on for a second after you unplug them.

It can definitely be harmful if you disassemble an electrical equipment and touch a capacitor though.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Electricity from a power outlet is AC. It is a series of pulses of alternating polarity. The charger needs to supply DC to the phone, which means stable power at a particular voltage. The charger needs to smooth the incoming AC to high voltage DC, then convert it to high frequency pulses to reduce the voltage in a small transformer, and finally smooth it again to get low voltage DC for the phone.

This smoothing is done using capacitors. They hold an electrical charge, and that charge can supply the circuit for a short time. Capacitors themselves leak some charge and discharge by themselves. Also, the charger circuits they’re connected to will discharge capacitors. If a phone is connected to the charger, this will discharge them faster.

None of this is harmful. Without anything connected, it is just a redistribution of electrons within the charger. If the phone is connected, electrons also flow through it. The phone may get an unacceptably low voltage for a while as the capacitors discharge, but the phone is designed to be okay with that.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Electricity from a power outlet is AC. It is a series of pulses of alternating polarity. The charger needs to supply DC to the phone, which means stable power at a particular voltage. The charger needs to smooth the incoming AC to high voltage DC, then convert it to high frequency pulses to reduce the voltage in a small transformer, and finally smooth it again to get low voltage DC for the phone.

This smoothing is done using capacitors. They hold an electrical charge, and that charge can supply the circuit for a short time. Capacitors themselves leak some charge and discharge by themselves. Also, the charger circuits they’re connected to will discharge capacitors. If a phone is connected to the charger, this will discharge them faster.

None of this is harmful. Without anything connected, it is just a redistribution of electrons within the charger. If the phone is connected, electrons also flow through it. The phone may get an unacceptably low voltage for a while as the capacitors discharge, but the phone is designed to be okay with that.