How can Scientist view the Atoms of something with an Electron Microscope without seeing the Atoms that make up the lenses of the Microscope?

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How can Scientist view the Atoms of something with an Electron Microscope without seeing the Atoms that make up the lenses of the Microscope?

In: Physics

Electron microscopes do not see things in the same sense as a microscope; it’s an incredibly sensitive machine that detects the wavelengths of things with sensors. Think like echolocation or catfish whiskers. Electron microscopes don’t have lenses.

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First of all, it is incredibly difficult to see anything at the atomic level with an electron microscope.

And more importantly, electron microscopes don’t use physical lenses. The lenses generate an electrical field that focuses and directs a fine electron beam. The beam travels in a vacuum before it strikes the sample.

Source: I used to use a Scanning Electron Microscope quite regularly.

Electron Microscopes do not have lenses. They use electrons to see small objects. Sensitive instruments detect scattering of electrons coming from an electron beam by the small object to create a computer image of the object.