How come the 5 second rule doesn’t work?

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How do germs jump on the food so fast when they’re so small?

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7 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

They don’t really have to move, there’s just get germs all over the floor and they stick to whatever food you drop on them.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Consider dropping a piece of food onto freshly painted floor. even if the paint is super thing its still between the food and the floor.

Germs are basically the same. They’re everywhere. If you’re food touches the floor it’s really sitting on a layer of germs. No jumping needed cause they are sandwiched and it’s even odds if they leave with the food or stay on the floor.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Touch something shiny or reflective, like a mirror or window. Just touch, and stop. Don’t even bother counting to five. Notice how your fingerprints are on the window or mirror? You didn’t even have to wait five seconds for your skin cells, body oils, bacteria, and whatever else is on your hand, to transfer to the window or mirror’s surface.

Same priciple applies when you drop your food onto the floor. Bacteria present on the floor don’t even have to wait five seconds to be transferred to your food item. Contact is made, surface contaminants are transferred.

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s like asking “How did my shoe get so oily from stepping on that oil when oil molecules are so tiny”

Size doesn’t matter, your toast is now smeared in dirt, grime and by extension germs. The 5 second rule should be called the “I hope my immune system can deal with this” rule.

Anonymous 0 Comments

when you drop food, you basically drop it on top of the germs. so they dont have to move, your food did it for them 😉

Anonymous 0 Comments

I have 3 dogs and 2 cats. No food item survives 5 seconds. If I can get to it first, and the hair/dirt combination is sufficiently low, it gets eaten.