How do scissors “know” what hand you’re holding them in?

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I’m left-handed and growing up, in school, there were never enough left handed scissors between myself and the maybe two other lefties in my class so I would often need to use right-handed scissors. But they would either not cut paper at all or kind of tear the paper, forcing me to switch to my right hand to get the scissors to cut smoothly.

Just yesterday I needed to trim a label and no matter how I angled the scissors, they would not cut the paper but they immediately did once I switched to my right hand. Thus, how do scissors “know” which hand you’re holding them in?

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78 Answers

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Anonymous 0 Comments

The way you grip the scissors causes a twisting force on them. Right hand twists both clockwise, pressing the blade edges together (in right-handed scissors) and improving the cut.

It happens because of the angle your fingers are at. You might even feel sore on your fingers from where the scissors press against them after a lot of cutting, because of this twisting force.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There’s a little bit of play in the blades. When you hold them in the correct hand, your hand is applying pressure to the cutting edges of the blades, sandwiching them together and making them cut better. When you’re using the wrong hand, you’re applying pressure to the dull side of the blades, pulling the cutting edges apart.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There’s a little bit of play in the blades. When you hold them in the correct hand, your hand is applying pressure to the cutting edges of the blades, sandwiching them together and making them cut better. When you’re using the wrong hand, you’re applying pressure to the dull side of the blades, pulling the cutting edges apart.

Anonymous 0 Comments

There’s a little bit of play in the blades. When you hold them in the correct hand, your hand is applying pressure to the cutting edges of the blades, sandwiching them together and making them cut better. When you’re using the wrong hand, you’re applying pressure to the dull side of the blades, pulling the cutting edges apart.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you open a right-handed scissors the left blade goes down and the right blade goes up.
When you open a left-handed scissors the right blade goes down and the left blade goes up.
The blades are in different positions depending on if it’s left or right handed.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you cut paper with the properly oriented scissors you create an orientation where the paper is being secured on one end with your free hand, and is secured on the other end by resting on the bottom of the scissor blade. Then the top scissor blade comes down and slices in between.

When you hold the scissors in the wrong hand, now your free hand and the bottom scissor blade are on the same side, and there is nothing secure the paper on the *other* side of the scissors. So when the top scissor blade comes down, instead of cutting the paper, it just folds it over.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you cut paper with the properly oriented scissors you create an orientation where the paper is being secured on one end with your free hand, and is secured on the other end by resting on the bottom of the scissor blade. Then the top scissor blade comes down and slices in between.

When you hold the scissors in the wrong hand, now your free hand and the bottom scissor blade are on the same side, and there is nothing secure the paper on the *other* side of the scissors. So when the top scissor blade comes down, instead of cutting the paper, it just folds it over.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The way you grip the scissors causes a twisting force on them. Right hand twists both clockwise, pressing the blade edges together (in right-handed scissors) and improving the cut.

It happens because of the angle your fingers are at. You might even feel sore on your fingers from where the scissors press against them after a lot of cutting, because of this twisting force.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you cut paper with the properly oriented scissors you create an orientation where the paper is being secured on one end with your free hand, and is secured on the other end by resting on the bottom of the scissor blade. Then the top scissor blade comes down and slices in between.

When you hold the scissors in the wrong hand, now your free hand and the bottom scissor blade are on the same side, and there is nothing secure the paper on the *other* side of the scissors. So when the top scissor blade comes down, instead of cutting the paper, it just folds it over.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The way you grip the scissors causes a twisting force on them. Right hand twists both clockwise, pressing the blade edges together (in right-handed scissors) and improving the cut.

It happens because of the angle your fingers are at. You might even feel sore on your fingers from where the scissors press against them after a lot of cutting, because of this twisting force.

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