how do small animals not get frostbite when they walk around on snow and ice all day?

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how do small animals not get frostbite when they walk around on snow and ice all day?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

They have a very high metabolism. They generate a huge amount of heat relative to their size, and have a much higher pulse and respiration rate to keep that warmth generating. If you scaled a mouse up to the size of an elephant, it would quickly die of hyperthermia, i.e. getting so hot it dies. Similarly, if you made an elephant the size of a mouse, it would quickly freeze to death

Anonymous 0 Comments

They have a very high metabolism. They generate a huge amount of heat relative to their size, and have a much higher pulse and respiration rate to keep that warmth generating. If you scaled a mouse up to the size of an elephant, it would quickly die of hyperthermia, i.e. getting so hot it dies. Similarly, if you made an elephant the size of a mouse, it would quickly freeze to death

Anonymous 0 Comments

Small animals have fur that helps to insulate their body and keep it warm. This insulation helps to keep their body temperature up and prevents frostbite. They also have a much faster metabolism than humans, which helps to generate body heat and keep them warm.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Small animals have fur or feathers that act as insulation to keep them warm. The fur or feathers trap air and create a layer of warmth around the animal’s body. The fur also helps to keep the animal’s feet from directly touching the cold snow and ice, which helps protect them from frostbite.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Small animals have fur that helps to insulate their body and keep it warm. This insulation helps to keep their body temperature up and prevents frostbite. They also have a much faster metabolism than humans, which helps to generate body heat and keep them warm.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Small animals have fur or feathers that act as insulation to keep them warm. The fur or feathers trap air and create a layer of warmth around the animal’s body. The fur also helps to keep the animal’s feet from directly touching the cold snow and ice, which helps protect them from frostbite.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I live in Canada and as a cat shelter volunteer, I have seen a lot of cats with frostbites over the years. They can lose part of their ears, or tails. We had one, [Gandalf](https://i.redd.it/vhy1pwu9zvi81.jpg), who almost lost a couple of paws. If you look between his eyes, you see see that he lost a small patch of skin. (Don’t worry he’s now completely healthy, living the good life in his forever home)

I know someone who rescue rabbits and they can have the same problems.

Anonymous 0 Comments

I live in Canada and as a cat shelter volunteer, I have seen a lot of cats with frostbites over the years. They can lose part of their ears, or tails. We had one, [Gandalf](https://i.redd.it/vhy1pwu9zvi81.jpg), who almost lost a couple of paws. If you look between his eyes, you see see that he lost a small patch of skin. (Don’t worry he’s now completely healthy, living the good life in his forever home)

I know someone who rescue rabbits and they can have the same problems.

Anonymous 0 Comments

they are hot they burn a lot of sugar and therefore they get hot everywhere, preventing frostbite

Anonymous 0 Comments

they are hot they burn a lot of sugar and therefore they get hot everywhere, preventing frostbite