How do sushi chefs kill bacteria?

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I know that they do flash freezing to kill parasites. But flash freezing only kills parasites, not bacteria. How they kill salmonella and stuff?

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Fish generally don’t have salmonella, and bacterial contamination is more of an issue with the digestive tract and external contamination + decay. So generally, using **fresh** fish that is properly handled (and frozen to take care of parasites in the flesh) is the way to go. However, raw meat goes bad quite quickly, hence why sushi has a poor shelf life.

It’s the same logic of why you can eat a steak despite the middle still being red and not fully cooked.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The primary way they prevent bacteria is to avoid getting bacteria on the fish in the first place. Food safety is very important in sushi kitchens and when handling fish for sushi. And even when you get some bacterial contamination the bacteria is not given the opportunity to multiply. This is why they use whole fish and only prepare the sushi moments before it is consumed. It is also one of the important reasons for flash freezing the fish as any bacteria will hibernate when frozen.

Anonymous 0 Comments

>I know that they do flash freezing to kill parasites. But flash freezing only kills parasites, not bacteria. How they kill salmonella and stuff?

Fresh meat generally will not contain many/any dangerous disease vectors because while the animal was still alive and well **so was its immune system**.
The more processing steps there are and the more time passes between the animal’s (and thus its immune system’s) demise, the more room there is for microorganism growth. If little to no time passes and if there are little to no processing steps, then there will be no microorganism growth.

Anonymous 0 Comments

With sushi-grade fish, its more prevention than sterilization. The fish is carefully stored and prepared to minimize the risk and time that bacteria have to colonize the refrigerated meat, and sushi generally is made to order on the spot or is only kept on cold shelves for a few hours before getting tossed.

meanwhile the living conditions of most chickens, and the conditions in which they are slaughtered and butchered makes it very easy for bacteria to contaminate the meat, but typically chicken is preferred thoroughly cooked even if you don’t have to worry about disease, so its not really an issue that people are pressured to solve since proper refrigeration and thorough cooking will handle the risks of foodborne illness. This is the same with cows and pigs too, but meat from pigs must be cooked all the way through to deal with parasites, and meat from cows typically are structured in a way that bacteria generally don’t get much farther than surface level unless its been ground up or tenderized, and as such you only need to thoroughly cook the outside of a solid cut of steak.

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

Ok I recall this from someone but after all this time I’ve never confirmed it. He told me it’s the wasabi and soy sauce that clenses any parasites or bacteria. Oh and to eat sushi, you put a bit of wasabi on top of the sushi and dip the bottom with the soy sauce

Anonymous 0 Comments

Just like you, dirty stuff is only on the outside skin and your poopy bits. Get rid of the outside skin, get rid of the poopy bits, take great care of making sure the outside skin and the poopy bits does not touch anything you want to eat raw, that’s how you get safe raw fish.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Sushi chef know… Fresh fish, less bacteria. Clean hands, clean tools. Wasabi, ginger, fight germs. Vinegar rice, keep bacteria away.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Sushi needs to be eaten at the spot is fresh food and is not made to keep for another day, quality sushi is made from super fresh fish

Anonymous 0 Comments

They dont. You eat whatever bacteria is on it. That bacteria then joins the trillions of others in your body.