How do weather apps/channels predict what the pollen count will be in future days?

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How do weather apps/channels predict what the pollen count will be in future days?

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11 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants watch the weather too, and they try to bloom when conditions are right.

If it’s been raining and now you have a warm, sunny, and windy day forecast tomorrow, you know plants are gonna take the opportunity to go nuts and coat your car with yellow dust.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants watch the weather too, and they try to bloom when conditions are right.

If it’s been raining and now you have a warm, sunny, and windy day forecast tomorrow, you know plants are gonna take the opportunity to go nuts and coat your car with yellow dust.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants watch the weather too, and they try to bloom when conditions are right.

If it’s been raining and now you have a warm, sunny, and windy day forecast tomorrow, you know plants are gonna take the opportunity to go nuts and coat your car with yellow dust.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants are fairly predictable in when they’ll bloom. Over the years we’ve gotten pretty good data on what weather conditions encourages plants to bloom and release pollen. If you have a big bloom and a light breeze you have a higher pollen count than if there was no breeze at all.

Anonymous 0 Comments

By monitoring a combination of weather factors and plant growth stages, and they can use air sampling devices to collect particles from the air and then analyze how much is in the sample at that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

By monitoring a combination of weather factors and plant growth stages, and they can use air sampling devices to collect particles from the air and then analyze how much is in the sample at that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

By monitoring a combination of weather factors and plant growth stages, and they can use air sampling devices to collect particles from the air and then analyze how much is in the sample at that time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants are fairly predictable in when they’ll bloom. Over the years we’ve gotten pretty good data on what weather conditions encourages plants to bloom and release pollen. If you have a big bloom and a light breeze you have a higher pollen count than if there was no breeze at all.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Plants are fairly predictable in when they’ll bloom. Over the years we’ve gotten pretty good data on what weather conditions encourages plants to bloom and release pollen. If you have a big bloom and a light breeze you have a higher pollen count than if there was no breeze at all.

Anonymous 0 Comments

#ELI5

Every Wednesday, Mr. Jacobs walks past your house to go to the library.

Week after week, without fail, you always see him go past your house on Wednesdays.

On sunny days, he wears a hat.
On rainy days, he carries an umbrella.
On colder days, he has on a coat.

It’s early Wednesday morning. It’s warm, but it looks like rain today.

PREDICT FOR ME:

* Will Mr. Jacobs pass your house?
* What will Mr. Jacobs have? A hat, umbrella, or coat?

How do you know?

* You saw things happening, week after week.
* You saw a pattern taking place (sunny = hat).
* You used that pattern to *predict* what would happen in the future.

Weather prediction (rain, snow, wind, temperature, UV, pollen) is the same thing. Over decades of watching the weather, they have noticed patterns taking place.

Example: When it’s 70° on Tuesday, and 72° on Wednesday, *most of the time,* it ends up being 74° on Thursday.

In other words: We’ve noticed *over 100 years* that *usually,* a 74° day occurs after consecutive 70° and 72° days.

So they use that pattern to predict what happens next. The amount of data is MASSIVE. They can notice patterns that take days or weeks to occur.