How does our stomach seperate stomach acid from other fluids we drink and controls what gets into our bladder?

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I’ve wondered about that today. I found no answer to how that’s possible, can someone please explain how our stomach achieves that?

In: Biology
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It doesn’t, really. Everything from the stomach enters the intestines, and there the stomach acid is neutralised by the addition of bicarbonate produced by the pancreas. That reaction produces carbon dioxide, salt, and water, all of which your intestine is fine to absorb.

[Ion pumps](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ion_transporter) more create and destroy acidity rather than separate it. Like a slightly leaky boat with a pump: as long as the pump is powered, the boat stays dry and afloat. Your stomach stays acidic, and your blood alkaline.

Also, the bladder does not receive liquid from the stomach (or digestive system)

The bladder is filled from the kidneys, which filter your blood stream

TLDR: Your stomach and bladder aren’t directly connected.

As you pointed out, your stomach makes lots of acid and chemicals to help break down food. The broken down food + acid then head to your intestines.

To protect your intestines, your body makes a basic liquid called bile. Acids and bases “cancel out”, leaving only the broken up bits of food. These bits are really tiny, so tiny that the cells of your intestine are able to take the useful bits and absorb them into your body (sometimes into the blood). The not-useful bits continue to go travel through your intestines until you poop them out.

Your bladder is connected to your kidneys. Your kidneys take blood and pass it through a tiny net. Only REALLY tiny stuff gets through. Blood cells and big chemicals won’t get through, and will stay in the blood. The tiny stuff flows through your kidney tubes. Just like in the intestines, the kidney cells take ‘useful bits’ back into the blood. Some of your kidney cells do the reverse – they put things in your blood that your body doesn’t want into your kidney tubes. The kidney tubes connect to your bladder and you pee it out.

Sort of related- you have two types of special cells in your kidney. One likes acid- it puts base in your kidney tubes to get rid of it, and puts acid back in your blood. The other does the reverse. These cells work together to make sure you don’t have too much acid or base in your body

talking about bladder, what goes into it doesn’t really depend on what’s in your stomach. the urine in the bladder is formed by filtration of blood, in fact. so like, contents of the stomach/intestine don’t directly affect contents of the bladder.