How does the human brain categorize memories and know if they were real events, fantasy or a lie?

299 views

How does the human brain categorize memories and know if they were real events, fantasy or a lie?

In: 21

18 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

It doesn’t really know, other than by cross referencing other memories.

You almost certainly have memories that aren’t real, but rather fabricated from stories people have told you about something you did.

You know all about that time you got super upset at your 4th birthday party, right? Remember it like it was yesterday? Or are you just remembering someone else’s memory of what you did? How can you tell?

Eyewitness testimony is considered a very poor form of evidence in court because the memory is malleable. Do you truly remember what you saw, or has your brain superimposed what you saw on TV later over your original memory?

You go back and edit memories all the time, and they become increasingly unreliable.

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

That’s the secret. It doesn’t. It doesn’t even know when you’re dreaming or awake. It’s all just as real to the brain. Everything you see, fell, remember, taste, is all just electrical signals interpreted by the brain. We don’t fully understand it yet. We’ll get there one day. But for now, they just say our brain is a quantum computer, and our body acts like a receiver doing as we wish

Anonymous 0 Comments

It doesn’t really know, other than by cross referencing other memories.

You almost certainly have memories that aren’t real, but rather fabricated from stories people have told you about something you did.

You know all about that time you got super upset at your 4th birthday party, right? Remember it like it was yesterday? Or are you just remembering someone else’s memory of what you did? How can you tell?

Eyewitness testimony is considered a very poor form of evidence in court because the memory is malleable. Do you truly remember what you saw, or has your brain superimposed what you saw on TV later over your original memory?

You go back and edit memories all the time, and they become increasingly unreliable.

Anonymous 0 Comments

It doesn’t really know, other than by cross referencing other memories.

You almost certainly have memories that aren’t real, but rather fabricated from stories people have told you about something you did.

You know all about that time you got super upset at your 4th birthday party, right? Remember it like it was yesterday? Or are you just remembering someone else’s memory of what you did? How can you tell?

Eyewitness testimony is considered a very poor form of evidence in court because the memory is malleable. Do you truly remember what you saw, or has your brain superimposed what you saw on TV later over your original memory?

You go back and edit memories all the time, and they become increasingly unreliable.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Memory is incredibly fallible. In fact, there was recently a [study](https://www.newscientist.com/article/2367992-your-short-term-memory-can-be-unreliable-after-just-a-few-seconds/) published that says memory is unreliable in as little as 3 seconds. So, you don’t really know if something is real world or not unless you have other ways of verifying the memories.