if IPs can change several times, how do apps deal with functionalities that required your previous IP? Also, why is IPv6 not the norm (i.e. in video games, web browsing, etc.)?

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if IPs can change several times, how do apps deal with functionalities that required your previous IP? Also, why is IPv6 not the norm (i.e. in video games, web browsing, etc.)?

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14 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

The trick is that only 1 person needs to have a the same IP, after that everyone else can just connect, present some proof that it’s them, the app people then just note down the IP and send it to them.

EG: Your app knows that the app’s servers are always at XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX IP, so it sends your stuff there with stuff that proves that it’s you, the server there sends stuff back to where it received it from.

A large chunk of the time, that person isn’t even the app maker. It’s the DNS server. That’s the server that turns www.reddit.com into whatever IP your computer uses.
Meaning reddit can move their IPs as often as they like, they just need to update the DNS guys.

IPv6 isn’t as common because it’s relatively new and some devices can’t use it yet.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Apps typically don’t need your previous IP.

Either you have a user account to identify you, or a session cookie, or something else.

An app or service would need your IP if they’re trying to initiate a connection with you, but servers rarely start this process on their own.

Usually, it’s you, your app, the “client” that makes the first move. When the client connects to the server, the server sees the current IP, and the old IP is no longer important to it.

Servers rarely change IPs, and when they do, their host name records are updated at the same time, so that www.whatever.site now points to the new IP.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The trick is that only 1 person needs to have a the same IP, after that everyone else can just connect, present some proof that it’s them, the app people then just note down the IP and send it to them.

EG: Your app knows that the app’s servers are always at XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX IP, so it sends your stuff there with stuff that proves that it’s you, the server there sends stuff back to where it received it from.

A large chunk of the time, that person isn’t even the app maker. It’s the DNS server. That’s the server that turns www.reddit.com into whatever IP your computer uses.
Meaning reddit can move their IPs as often as they like, they just need to update the DNS guys.

IPv6 isn’t as common because it’s relatively new and some devices can’t use it yet.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Apps don’t usually need your IP to know who you are. They would do that through cookies/tokens/connection ID; some kind of data your device can present to the app service that it uses to distinguish you from everyone else. With that, no matter where you’re coming from (even if your IP changes) they will keep track of your latest routing information and send you your necessary data.

When an app you’re using needs to interact with a service providing the functionality of the app, it usually uses DNS to be directed to the right IP, rather than a fixed IP (although it can use a fixed IP, but that’s inefficient).

Anonymous 0 Comments

Apps don’t usually need your IP to know who you are. They would do that through cookies/tokens/connection ID; some kind of data your device can present to the app service that it uses to distinguish you from everyone else. With that, no matter where you’re coming from (even if your IP changes) they will keep track of your latest routing information and send you your necessary data.

When an app you’re using needs to interact with a service providing the functionality of the app, it usually uses DNS to be directed to the right IP, rather than a fixed IP (although it can use a fixed IP, but that’s inefficient).

Anonymous 0 Comments

Apps typically don’t need your previous IP.

Either you have a user account to identify you, or a session cookie, or something else.

An app or service would need your IP if they’re trying to initiate a connection with you, but servers rarely start this process on their own.

Usually, it’s you, your app, the “client” that makes the first move. When the client connects to the server, the server sees the current IP, and the old IP is no longer important to it.

Servers rarely change IPs, and when they do, their host name records are updated at the same time, so that www.whatever.site now points to the new IP.

Anonymous 0 Comments

1. IP’s are for routing, they’re not for identification. Applications know they can always change, and are designed to handle that. If your IP address changes, the app will just set up a new session.
2. IPv6 is a very gradual and ‘invisible’ phase-in, about 40% of the world has it now, and steadily increasing by 4-5% per year as one network after the other gets upgraded. Backwards compatibility with IPv4 is almost seamless and widespread (most people never notice they’re on IPv6), so it’s likely there will still be lots of IPv4 ‘islands’ on the internet for many decades – but nobody will particularly care because those are connected to the wider IPv6 internet through proxies, tunnels and NAT64.

Anonymous 0 Comments

1. IP’s are for routing, they’re not for identification. Applications know they can always change, and are designed to handle that. If your IP address changes, the app will just set up a new session.
2. IPv6 is a very gradual and ‘invisible’ phase-in, about 40% of the world has it now, and steadily increasing by 4-5% per year as one network after the other gets upgraded. Backwards compatibility with IPv4 is almost seamless and widespread (most people never notice they’re on IPv6), so it’s likely there will still be lots of IPv4 ‘islands’ on the internet for many decades – but nobody will particularly care because those are connected to the wider IPv6 internet through proxies, tunnels and NAT64.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you require your ip to be static for something look up noIP or anything similar.

You only really need an IP when dealing with hosting so the client knows where to send a response.

If the IP changes you use a noIP client on your host computer to tell a service when you IP updates. That service will give you a domain address to point to instead of an IP.

Anonymous 0 Comments

If you require your ip to be static for something look up noIP or anything similar.

You only really need an IP when dealing with hosting so the client knows where to send a response.

If the IP changes you use a noIP client on your host computer to tell a service when you IP updates. That service will give you a domain address to point to instead of an IP.