Legal framework for contact sports (mma, boxing, hockey, etc.)

200 views

This just popped into my head today and I was curious. Certainly tons of actions that are business as usual in sports would be considered assault in different contexts. What prevents players from suing eachother for injuries and stuff? Curious about both professional levels and recreational/amateur levels, if they’re different.

Also, is there a line where actions outside of the rules (cheap shots, etc.) could be considered assault or something else?

In: 8

21 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you sign up for a sport, in the T&Cs it states that you can’t sue others players, the clubs or the league for damages sustained on the field. You basically sign over your right to not be assaulted while on the field.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you sign up for a sport, in the T&Cs it states that you can’t sue others players, the clubs or the league for damages sustained on the field. You basically sign over your right to not be assaulted while on the field.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Informed consent, the players know what they are letting themselves into and agree to a limited amount of contact within the rules.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When you sign up for a sport, in the T&Cs it states that you can’t sue others players, the clubs or the league for damages sustained on the field. You basically sign over your right to not be assaulted while on the field.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Informed consent, the players know what they are letting themselves into and agree to a limited amount of contact within the rules.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Informed consent, the players know what they are letting themselves into and agree to a limited amount of contact within the rules.

Anonymous 0 Comments

>Also, is there a line where actions outside of the rules (cheap shots, etc.) could be considered assault or something else?

The governing body of the sport generally has rules and processes for situations like this. Sometimes it involves in game penalties, such as time in the penalty box for fighting in hockey, or a flag for unsportsman like conduct in football. If the contact is illegal, but totally incidental like a kick to the groin in MMA, a pause is called to allow the kicked party time to recover.

If a participant shows that they are a chronic offender or the behavior is habitual, there is escalating punishment outside of the competition. Small fines or short suspensions to begin, escalating to larger fines and longer suspensions, to potentially even a total ban from participation. It generally won’t ever get to the level of legal action. If you are shown to be a habitual offender, teams wouldn’t want you with them as you would likely cause problems in the locker room, and opponents wouldn’t want to face you because you are a known cheater.

Anonymous 0 Comments

>Also, is there a line where actions outside of the rules (cheap shots, etc.) could be considered assault or something else?

The governing body of the sport generally has rules and processes for situations like this. Sometimes it involves in game penalties, such as time in the penalty box for fighting in hockey, or a flag for unsportsman like conduct in football. If the contact is illegal, but totally incidental like a kick to the groin in MMA, a pause is called to allow the kicked party time to recover.

If a participant shows that they are a chronic offender or the behavior is habitual, there is escalating punishment outside of the competition. Small fines or short suspensions to begin, escalating to larger fines and longer suspensions, to potentially even a total ban from participation. It generally won’t ever get to the level of legal action. If you are shown to be a habitual offender, teams wouldn’t want you with them as you would likely cause problems in the locker room, and opponents wouldn’t want to face you because you are a known cheater.

Anonymous 0 Comments

>Also, is there a line where actions outside of the rules (cheap shots, etc.) could be considered assault or something else?

The governing body of the sport generally has rules and processes for situations like this. Sometimes it involves in game penalties, such as time in the penalty box for fighting in hockey, or a flag for unsportsman like conduct in football. If the contact is illegal, but totally incidental like a kick to the groin in MMA, a pause is called to allow the kicked party time to recover.

If a participant shows that they are a chronic offender or the behavior is habitual, there is escalating punishment outside of the competition. Small fines or short suspensions to begin, escalating to larger fines and longer suspensions, to potentially even a total ban from participation. It generally won’t ever get to the level of legal action. If you are shown to be a habitual offender, teams wouldn’t want you with them as you would likely cause problems in the locker room, and opponents wouldn’t want to face you because you are a known cheater.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Just as an FYI there are class action lawsuits happening in professional rugby at the moment. Prob similar to the American Football concussion saga.