Our lungs are not in our stomach, so how is it possible to expand our stomach when breathing in?

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What exactly is happening when we expand our stomach when breathing and what specifically are we doing differently when we breathe through our chest?

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14 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

As we breathe in, the muscles in our thorax spread the lungs, making them grow in size while filling with air and pressing every nearby structure. The diaphragm that separates lungs from bowels happens to be one of the least rigid structures, compared to the ribs.

Anonymous 0 Comments

When we inhale lungs expand downwards, so stomach gets pushed a bit outside. When we exhale lungs come back up and stomach can return back. With deep breaths effect is bigger and more visible, than with shallow breath.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The diaphragm separates the abdominal cavity from the chest cavity. Pulling the diaphragm down (it’s a muscle) pushes out the abdomen (stomach) and increases the size of the chest cavity, filling the lungs with air. The other way to breath in is to use the muscles between the ribs (intercostal muscles) to increase the size of the rib cage and thus the size of the chest cavity and the volume of lungs.

Anonymous 0 Comments

All your bits inside your torso take up a specific amount of space. When you take a breath your lungs are expanding because a muscle below your lungs, the diaphragm, pulls them downward. Toward your stomach. Which pushes your stomach out of the way because there’s only so much space. Fortunately, your belly (and your ribs to a lesser extent) can expand to accommodate all this pushing and pulling as you breathe.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Our lungs don’t expand on their own the diaphragm moves down which create a mini vacuum in the lungs which then pulls air into the lungs, the movement of the diaphragm can also impact the stomach.

Anonymous 0 Comments

As we breathe in, the muscles in our thorax spread the lungs, making them grow in size while filling with air and pressing every nearby structure. The diaphragm that separates lungs from bowels happens to be one of the least rigid structures, compared to the ribs.

Anonymous 0 Comments

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Anonymous 0 Comments

When we inhale lungs expand downwards, so stomach gets pushed a bit outside. When we exhale lungs come back up and stomach can return back. With deep breaths effect is bigger and more visible, than with shallow breath.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The diaphragm separates the abdominal cavity from the chest cavity. Pulling the diaphragm down (it’s a muscle) pushes out the abdomen (stomach) and increases the size of the chest cavity, filling the lungs with air. The other way to breath in is to use the muscles between the ribs (intercostal muscles) to increase the size of the rib cage and thus the size of the chest cavity and the volume of lungs.

Anonymous 0 Comments

All your bits inside your torso take up a specific amount of space. When you take a breath your lungs are expanding because a muscle below your lungs, the diaphragm, pulls them downward. Toward your stomach. Which pushes your stomach out of the way because there’s only so much space. Fortunately, your belly (and your ribs to a lesser extent) can expand to accommodate all this pushing and pulling as you breathe.