The way of light- now you see me but why

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I was wondering why it is that I see the things I do. The ocean seems simple enough light from the sun hits sun and all colors are absorbed except blue so I see blue. (What makes the sea blue I don’t know) however let’s say it’s dusk how come I can see trees which are in shadows and the sun isn’t directly hitting them. Is light reflected off the clouds which then shines on the objects in my vision? What properties of objects makes it to they absorb certain Coralie and reflects others.
Another thing how do different color lenses affect the colors I perceive and why?

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Its pretty simple, the light comes from the sun hits anything on the earth, then it reflects into your retina ( eyes) and your brain processes it and then shows it to you in frontside view, its an amazing process which shows how life is simply amazing for us

The color of objects depends on the molecules they are made of or coated with (paint). Molecules consist of atoms bound together by strong forces. Within these atoms, there are tiny particles called electrons. Electrons move around the core of an atom, and they do so with a certain energy. When light hits an electron, its energy increases, and then the energy is released in some different way. So the light gets absorbed. But only certain wavelenghts of light are capable of exciting electrons to a higher energy level. And these wavelenghts are different for each molecule.

>Is light reflected off the clouds which then shines on the objects in my vision?

Yes the light can reflect off of clouds, the grass, every object reflects a little light, which is why you can see things not in direct light.

>What properties of objects makes it to they absorb certain Coralie and reflects others

It has to do with electrons in atoms. Essentially different colors of light are light wiggling at slightly different speeds. When light hits an object, if the atoms can’t wiggle at that speed, the energy is absorbed.

>Another thing how do different color lenses affect the colors I perceive and why?

If you use a red lense, only red light gets through. Objects that don’t reflect any red light will look black.

The atmosphere (air) scatters light. This is why shadows created by the sun on Earth aren’t pitch black, like they are e.g. on the Moon. In a shadow on Earth, light is still coming in from other directions than straight from the sun, “filling in” the shadow with some light.

At dusk, the sun is below the horizon, so there is no direct path from it to your eye, or to your surroundings. But it’s still giving off light that comes over the horizon and bounces back down off the atmosphere to illuminate the sky and your environment. Of course, as the sun sets further below the horizon, there are fewer and fewer light rays that make it over the horizon (i.e. that aren’t blocked by the planet) so eventually all the light disappears, going from dusk, to “civil twilight”, to “nautical twilight”, to “astronomical twilight” and finally to full night. But dusk and twilight can last a long time, especially in summer if you’re far from the equator. In many places, night never totally sets in during summer – it’s just some degree of dusk/dawn or twilight all the way from sunset to sunrise.