What are symbolic links in linux commands

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Are they similar to shortcut in windows ?

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6 Answers

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes, very similar. They have much nicer behaviour than Windows shortcuts though. You can treat them as if they are the file they are pointing to in almost all cases, while windows will mostly only follow shortcuts when the user double clicks on them.

If you delete the file the symbolic link points to, the symlink becomes broken.

Symbolic links are sometimes called “soft links” as well.

You can also create “hard links” which more or less makes a file exist in two directories at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes, very similar. They have much nicer behaviour than Windows shortcuts though. You can treat them as if they are the file they are pointing to in almost all cases, while windows will mostly only follow shortcuts when the user double clicks on them.

If you delete the file the symbolic link points to, the symlink becomes broken.

Symbolic links are sometimes called “soft links” as well.

You can also create “hard links” which more or less makes a file exist in two directories at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

Yes, very similar. They have much nicer behaviour than Windows shortcuts though. You can treat them as if they are the file they are pointing to in almost all cases, while windows will mostly only follow shortcuts when the user double clicks on them.

If you delete the file the symbolic link points to, the symlink becomes broken.

Symbolic links are sometimes called “soft links” as well.

You can also create “hard links” which more or less makes a file exist in two directories at the same time.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The thing about a windows shortcut is that it’s still a “normal file”, and programs not expecting to handle them may simply open them and get data about what the shortcut points to. This file contains additional info about the shortcut, including options like a picture to use.

Symlinks are actual links on the filesystem itself. They have no features – you can’t pick an icon for them – but the operating system itself will perform the redirect on behalf of the application by default unless it specifically indicates it wants to examine the symlink itself rather than what it is pointing at. So it always works. Even on the command-line.

It also means you can point to anything. Symlinks for major system directories, minor directories, runnable files or your own media are all fine. If you constantly mistake your “Downloads” directory as “Download”, make a symlink and never worry again. If you want a directory full of your custom apps, go ahead and make one. And so on and so forth….

It also means symlinks only work on unix-intended filesystems. They are not available on FAT formatted disks, for example.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The thing about a windows shortcut is that it’s still a “normal file”, and programs not expecting to handle them may simply open them and get data about what the shortcut points to. This file contains additional info about the shortcut, including options like a picture to use.

Symlinks are actual links on the filesystem itself. They have no features – you can’t pick an icon for them – but the operating system itself will perform the redirect on behalf of the application by default unless it specifically indicates it wants to examine the symlink itself rather than what it is pointing at. So it always works. Even on the command-line.

It also means you can point to anything. Symlinks for major system directories, minor directories, runnable files or your own media are all fine. If you constantly mistake your “Downloads” directory as “Download”, make a symlink and never worry again. If you want a directory full of your custom apps, go ahead and make one. And so on and so forth….

It also means symlinks only work on unix-intended filesystems. They are not available on FAT formatted disks, for example.

Anonymous 0 Comments

The thing about a windows shortcut is that it’s still a “normal file”, and programs not expecting to handle them may simply open them and get data about what the shortcut points to. This file contains additional info about the shortcut, including options like a picture to use.

Symlinks are actual links on the filesystem itself. They have no features – you can’t pick an icon for them – but the operating system itself will perform the redirect on behalf of the application by default unless it specifically indicates it wants to examine the symlink itself rather than what it is pointing at. So it always works. Even on the command-line.

It also means you can point to anything. Symlinks for major system directories, minor directories, runnable files or your own media are all fine. If you constantly mistake your “Downloads” directory as “Download”, make a symlink and never worry again. If you want a directory full of your custom apps, go ahead and make one. And so on and so forth….

It also means symlinks only work on unix-intended filesystems. They are not available on FAT formatted disks, for example.