What are the differences between bogey, hostile, bandit etc. in Air Force terms?

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What are the differences between bogey, hostile, bandit etc. in Air Force terms?

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A bogey is an unidentified aircraft. It could be friendly, it could be enemy, it could be neutral… you just don’t know.

A bandit is an aircraft identified as an enemy/hostile aircraft.

There’s really not much to it. The terms are just used as they can be said quickly and are easy to understand.

A bogey is an unidentified aircraft. It could be a friendly, an enemy or a civilian.

A bandit is an enemy aircraft that is not engaging or being engaged in combat.

Contrary to what movies show, you would never shoot down a bogey or bandit.

A hostile is an enemy aircraft that you are cleared to engage or that has attacked you and you are allowed to engage in self defense.

Bogey : Any aircraft that is unidentified. Could be anything.

Bandit : An aircraft that is confirmed enemy, but aren’t attacking you or any friendly aircraft.

Hostile : An aircraft attacking you or friendly aircraft.

Do you wanna know about FOX 1, 2 and 3?

Bogey: Unknown aircraft

Bandit: Craft identified as an enemy but not engaging in hostile action.

Hostile:…yeah.

in an organized airforce within a military you DO NOT engage bogeys or bandits unless ordered so by a higher lead in command that has the proof that dictate that not doing so is a danger.

Someone else correct me but aren’t these simply brevity codes that can differ from unit to unit?

bogey is an unidentified aircraft. you dont want to shoot them down.

bandit is an enemy aircraft that is not engaging in combat. you dont want to shoot them down until you are cleared to

hostile is an enemy aircraft that is engaging in combat with you or you were cleared to engage

Since the correct answer was already given here’s a [link to a youtube video](https://youtu.be/9kqZ2m7AbYI) from Armor Cast explaining these terms and some other air combat terminology (19min long) for those that are interested

The difference between at the least a Bogey and a Hostile, in “explain it badly” style:

You spot a *Bogey*, and keep an eye on it to see what its trying to do

You spot a ***HOSTILE,*** you better hope you’re a better shot than he is otherwise he’s gonna try to vibe-check your jet with a Tomahawk missile

Bogey: unknown aircraft. Could be friendly, hostile, civilian etc.

Outlaw: aircraft is suspected bandit. Ie: flying in area where enemies are known to be or at a speed that excludes being civilian.

Bandit: enemy aircraft but not currently performing a hostile act.

Hostile: enemy aircraft that is engaged with you or other friendly.

I think it depends on what branch of service or if you are in Aviation. I was in the Artillery for 22 years. Only ever heard of enemy aircraft referred to as fast mover for fighter jets or if it is a helicopter the kind of helicopter Hind-d for example. For combat arms personnel there is no need to broadcast friendly aircraft.

Everyone is telling you what they mean but I can tell you where to find out more:

Google: APP-7 Joint Brevity Codewords

The reason they are used is to have common meaning across nations that don’t speak english well, and to reduce confusion in high tempo situations.